Q & A with Hannah Thompsett

The Upstate New York Ceramics Invitational at Main Street Arts will feature functional and sculptural ceramic work by 13 artists from the region. This invitational represents some of the most exciting contemporary ceramic work being made in upstate New York.

The exhibition will be held July 11–August 29, 2015.
Online purchasing will begin in mid-July.

Hannah Thompsett

Alfred ceramic artist Hannah Thompsett

Hannah Thompsett

Q: Where are you from originally and where are you now?
A: I am originally from Scio, NY, a small town in Western NY. I spent the past two years in Rochester, and now I am a first year graduate student at Alfred University.

Q: When did you realize you wanted to be a ceramic artist?
A: I was introduced to ceramics in high school, and fell in love with the material. However, I was not sure I wanted to pursue ceramics until after I took a ceramics class in undergrad.

Q: Did you make other types of artwork before finding ceramics? Do you currently make other work?
A: I have always enjoyed drawing, and still find forms of it important to my studio practice. In addition to working in ceramics, I also fold paper. I have recently begun to use black and white photography paper and digital photography as well.

Q: Do you have an artistic hero or an artist you look up to?
A: My favorite artist right now is Uta Barth. I think that her photographs are beautiful. I enjoy that her subject matter is visual perception. Someday, I would like to be able to use the subtleties of light and color as well as she does.

Q: What is your largest source of inspiration?
A: I am constantly inspired by my dad, who is a wood worker and furniture maker. I grew up in an environment where there was always a project happening. His attention to detail and level of craftsmanship push me to attain that same level of finish in my own work.

Q: Do you look forward to opening the kiln? Or do you wince at the thought of something going wrong in there?
A: I think that opening the kiln is always a mix of excitement and fear. When I am waiting for a kiln to fire or cool, I usually have a lot of dreams, most of which are much more terrifying than anything that has actually come out of the kiln. One thing that drives making is striving to understand more about the ceramic process and overcome problems that may happen in the kiln.

Q: What is it like being a ceramic artist in Upstate NY?
A: I have been working as an artist in Western NY for the past couple of years. I have found there to be many institutions and individuals who are willing to support the exploration of a young artist. I feel grateful for this support. Also, I have enjoyed meeting many other artists in the area who are also supportive of each other. For me personally, it is nice to be close to the support of my family, and also part of this community.

Q: Where else are you showing your work this summer or fall?
A: I am currently in graduate school, so I am not focused on showing my work right now. I’m hoping to spend a lot of time in the studio this summer working out some ideas while school is not in session.

Q: Is there anything strange or unique that people might not know about you?
A: I don’t think there is anything too strange about me. I have recently begun to work in a darkroom, which I find to be a peaceful environment conducive to clear thinking.

Sculpture by Hannah Thompsett

Sculpture by Hannah Thompsett

Artwork by Hannah Thompsett

Artwork by Hannah Thompsett

Artwork by Hannah Thompsett

Artwork by Hannah Thompsett

Artwork by Hannah Thompsett

Artwork by Hannah Thompsett

Where can people see more of your work/follow you?
Website: www.hannahthompsett.com
Instagram: @hannahthompsettsculpture

Check out the previous Q & A with ceramic artist Kate Symonds.

Student Art Camp 2015

Afternoon art sessions at Main Street Arts for students in grades 7–10. Projects will include portrait painting, drawing from life, collage, and most importantly using your imagination. A new project will be completed each day!

Join us for this summer's Student Art Camps at Main Street Arts!

Join us for this summer’s Student Art Camps at Main Street Arts!

Grades 7–10 | Fours sessions over two weeks
Tues 7/21, Thur 7/23, Tues 7/28, Thur 7/30 | 1–3pm

Tues 7/21, Self-Portrait Painting: Learn how to draw the human face and create your own unique self-portrait!

Thur 7/23, Collage: Experiment with different materials to create a one-of-a-kind collage. This session emphasizes the importance of trying new things!

Tues 7/28, Watercolor Basics: In this session, explore layering colors and using watercolor techniques to create beautiful watercolor paintings.

Thur 7/30, Drawing from Life: Students draw still life objects to learn one of the most important tools in an artist’s toolbox, drawing from real life!

Call, email, or stop by the gallery to sign up today! $15 per session or $50 for all four sessions.

Inside The Artist’s Studio with Tom Kredo: In the Basement

I was born in Detroit, Michigan, the youngest of four with two  sisters and a brother. When I was only 5 my father died, and my stay at home mother became the household breadwinner. I was too young to have many memories of my father, but I was told he had a darkroom in the basement. I have a handful of his photos that he developed of my oldest sister. So when my mother gave me a Kodak Brownie camera and later an Instamatic camera, it must have been under the influence of my father that I became intrigued with making print images from a little box.

Tom Kredo, "Winter View", 2015

Tom Kredo, “Winter View”, 2015

I had plans to apply to RIT to major in Photography after graduating with my Bachelor of Arts degree. I did not. I got a more practical Management degree. Photography was pushed to the side to focus on a career in business, and then later, raising my daughter. Although I always had a darkroom in the basement, I only used it to document my life and the lives of those around me (just like Dad!). The art side of Photography lay dormant until I remarried and finished raising my daughter. It has since seeped back into my life a little bit more every year. Now that I’m retired, I have the ability to pick up where I left off 40 years ago, albeit in a computer transformed world.

My formal art training is replaced by reading art theory books, taking classes in drawing and art, and visiting art galleries. I recently took a talking tour of the Memorial Art Gallery with my BFA friend, while pondering the question “What is Art”? I use the internet every day to help me with post processing techniques and learn from professional photographers. It’s an amazing time we live in.

Pencil drawing from art class

Pencil drawing from art class

Today, the darkroom equipment in my basement is long gone, replaced by my Canon printer, my home assembled PC, my Craftsman workbench table, my mat cutter, and my paper cutter. Although the photographic process has changed, I’m still in the basement.

I cut my own mats with a Logan 450 mat cutter which I find to be a challenge. Precision is everything and it reminds me of wrestling with carpentry projects. You just can’t be off by ¼ inch and have it look good. I recycle a lot of mat paper.

I have a decent HP monitor that can be calibrated, unlike many of the less expensive models. Calibration is important because I want the print to look like the image I see on my computer. I use a Spyder calibration tool about once a month. It attaches to my monitor via suction cups, and I run a software program that instructs me to make changes to my monitor settings. It works nicely as I can see what I print.

Tom Kredo, "Leaf Lines", 2013

Tom Kredo, “Leaf Lines”, 2013

I print my own images using a Canon Pro-100 printer using Canon paper.   I’ve started refilling my own cartridges with bulk ink, which costs a fraction of the manufacturer’s ink. The Pro-100 has been a workhorse for me.

I assemble my own frames by buying in bulk. The challenge here is keeping small bits of dust from getting on the mat under the glass. Using a combination of canned air, cotton gloves, gum erasers and micro fiber cloths, I eventually get the framed photo dust and dirt free!

On the software side, I rent Photoshop/Lightroom from Adobe for a monthly fee. I also use Google’s EFX plug-in tools that seamlessly work the Adobe products. Together, these three tools are what I use to process about 95% of all my photos.

You can see more of Tom’s photography on Flickr. Stop by to see two of his pieces in our current juried exhibition, Structurally Speaking.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by printmaker Ellie Honl.

Q & A with Kate Symonds

The Upstate New York Ceramics Invitational at Main Street Arts will feature functional and sculptural ceramic work by 13 artists from the region. This invitational represents some of the most exciting contemporary ceramic work being made in upstate New York.

The exhibition will be held July 11–August 29, 2015.
Online purchasing will begin in mid-July.

Kate Symonds

Canandaigua ceramic artist Kate Symonds

Kate Symonds

Q: Where are you from originally and where are you now?
A: I was born and raised in Canandaigua NY. I lived in Rochester, California, Colorado and now live in my hometown as the proprietor and potter at Coach Street Clay.

Q: When did you realize you wanted to be a ceramic artist?
A: I realized that I wanted to be a ceramic artist freshman year of college.  It was the material, the community of the ceramic studio, and the challenge of learning to center and build with clay. One semester of this and I was hooked.  It was in the “Professional Craft Business Practices” class at RIT that I came up with the idea to renovate a barn into a studio, gallery and living space. A few years passed, I did a couple artist residences, waited on tables and started looking for property to buy.  There it was!  I found an old dilapidated barn in downtown Canandaigua in 2007. As a carpenter’s daughter I could see the potential in this property.  After about three years of blood, sweat, and renovation tears I was in business. Coach Street Clay opened in October 2010.

Q: Did you make other types of artwork before finding ceramics? Do you currently make other work?
A: I first went to college for fine arts. I was into drawing and painting and figurative work. When I found clay my focus was sculptural. I became interested in making pots while at my Genesee Pottery residency. At an Anderson Ranch winter residency I jumped in to making pots and never looked back.

Q: Do you have an artistic hero or an artist you look up to?
Just one hero? No. I have immense admiration for all of the mothers and fathers who are makers and entrepreneurs. Raising a child while cultivating a business through art and clay requires more all nighters in the studio than most believe to be humanly possible. Stories of other mothers doing it too is motivating.

Q: What is your largest source of inspiration?
A: Springtime, gardening, nature walks, lake swimming, my daughter Sylah’s perspective.

Q: Do you look forward to opening the kiln? Or do you wince at the thought of something going wrong in there?
A: I love opening the kiln! When things go wrong, therein lies good information. Most of the time things go right at this point. Unless of course I have the time to experiment and push things a bit, but still that is where the good work comes from.

Q: What is it like being a ceramic artist in Upstate NY?
A: I have found my place in the world as the village potter in downtown Canandaigua in the beauty of the Finger Lakes. It is a dream that continues to unfold as my business is welcomed and supported by the local people. Coach Street Clay has become part of the community here. My story is told and re-told as my pots continue find homes in Canandaigua, the Fingers Lakes and beyond.

Q: Where else are you showing your work this summer or fall?
Coach Street Clay’s retail gallery is open to the public 5 days a week. I will also be showing at regional juried craft shows such as Craft Alliance in Chautauqua NY, Clothesline in Rochester, and others.

Q: Is there anything strange or unique that people might not know about you?
A: I’ve always had a thing for climbing trees. Many of my childhood memories involve tree climbing. I still climb trees when the mood strikes. Another thing, my 6 year old daughter Sylah and I are learning to play the violin together.

Teapot by Kate Symonds

Teapot by Kate Symonds

Mug by Kate Symonds

Mug by Kate Symonds

Mug by Kate Symonds

Mug by Kate Symonds

Bowl by Kate Symonds

Bowl by Kate Symonds

Vase by Kate Symonds

Vase by Kate Symonds

Where can people see more of your work/follow you?
Website: www.coachstreetclay.com

Check out the previous Q & A with ceramic artist Kala Stein.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Ellie Honl: Part II

Hello, my name is Ellie Honl and for this second post, I would like to share a little more about my creative process with you.

I first want to give you a glimpse at my creative process by using a diagram I recently created.  I feel like there are unlimited ways that one can be an artist and I want to share with you the way that I work.

UK.pdf

Creative process by diagram: to be read from top to bottom

I always start by observing the environment around me whether I am actively or passively taking part in it. After looking over the art I have made from the last ten years, I recently discovered that I have always been inspired by wonder, and my curiosity about the unknown. That sense of wonder has come from the natural world as well as the human constructed. I do some research about the thing that has inspired me and then I jump into experimenting and playing with process. I evaluate these outcomes and continue experimenting. Why “experiment” instead of “make art?” I feel like it is much easier to be creative when there is no pressure or self judgement. I do more experimenting, then spend time researching things related to the outcomes. I assemble the pieces with this new knowledge while I try to balance opposing forces. Then I re-evaluate and continue creating.

Inspiration:
So what is wonder? It is the zone between the known and unknown. It is the child-like sense of awe and amazement. It could also be the sublime, horrific, and grotesque. It is the rapt attention or astonishment at something awesomely mysterious or new to one’s experience.

Over the past seven years, here are some images of things that have inspired wonder in me, and which I have included in my artwork:

A swarm of starling birds

A swarm of starling birds

Screen Shot 2015-06-19 at 12.27.17 PM

Colorful mold

Wardian Cases from the Victorian era.

Wardian Cases from the Victorian era.

Naturally occurring, geometric minerals.

Naturally occurring, geometric minerals.

The Maunsell Sea Forts, England.

The Maunsell Sea Forts, England.

Process:
The mediums I use to create my artwork are primarily printmaking with the addition of photography, and time-based media (video).

Printmaking is the transference of an image from a matrix (wood block, copper plate, silkscreen) by use of pressure onto another substrate – usually a piece of paper. I love printmaking because of its unique look and its ability to work well with other mediums. Because the original image (matrix) is not destroyed, it allows me to experiment more and to create a lot of variations.

I’m currently using photography in my work in the form of the alternative process technique called cyanotype. I love the moody blues it produces and it is extremely quick and easy. I’ve been making photograms with it by laying objects on top of the paper I’ve coated with the solution then placing it in the sun to expose.

"Coming Together" was created by exposing gravel and bark to the cyanotype-coated paper.

“Coming Together” was created by exposing gravel and bark to the cyanotype-coated paper.

I use stop-motion animation to compliment the whimsical, quirky feel of the prints and to bring their narrative to life. I like that the medium is appealing and more accessible to people. The process is very time-consuming, but the results are like magic!

A setup of my stop-motion workspace.

A setup of my stop-motion workspace.

That is a quick synopsis of my creative process as well as an explanation of the techniques I use to create my artwork. For more images of my artwork and explanations about them, check out my website at www.elliehonl.com  Thanks for following and make sure to check out the show Structurally Speaking.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Ellie Honl: Part I

_MG_7924My name is Ellie Honl and I am currently an art professor at Indiana University in Bloomington, IN. I am originally from Stevens Point, a city of about 35,000 in Central Wisconsin. My mother is an art teacher so I was very fortunate to have early exposure to the arts. I had an endless supply of art materials, and my mom took my younger brother and I to a lot of art museums growing up. We lived in an area where there weren’t many other children, so my brother and I spent a lot of time entertaining ourselves by building forts in the forest behind our house, Lego cities, and elaborate canal systems in our sandbox. I also taught myself things like calligraphy and needlepoint. This history of exploration and independence contributes to my art making today.

 

I thought about being an artist as a child, but in high school I loved math and science, and planned to become a psychiatrist or architect. It wasn’t until my junior year at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota that I finally decided to pursue studio art. Even though I liked a lot of different subjects, art was the one that fulfilled me the most and satisfied my need to create. The subject of psychology and architectural elements play a major role in my artwork today.

I pursued printmaking at the University of Iowa and received my MFA in 2008. Since then, I have taught art at a number of Universities and art centers across the country while continuing to make my own artwork.

This is me screenprinting in the printshop at Indiana University.

This is me screenprinting in the classroom at Indiana University.

My artwork utilizes printmaking techniques along with photographic and time-based media. I’ve currently been making screenprints and cyanotypes that I incorporate together by sewing, and I often paint and add other collaged elements to them. I also make stop-motion animations with these prints and/or parts of these prints.

"Assemble," cyanotype, screenprint, sewing, collage, 2013

“Assemble,” cyanotype, screenprint, sewing, collage, 2013

"Take Root" (detail), cyanotype, screenprint, sewing, 2013

“Take Root” (detail), cyanotype, screenprint, sewing, 2013

I am inspired by the wonders I observe around me (often in nature) but the outcome of my artwork is usually about the human condition: how we cope, how we perceive, and how we are affected by our past. It is about the human desire to find stability. Through my artwork, I try to understand why things are the way they are and strive to find logic in the random. I work intuitively allowing myself to experiment with unpredictable processes to discover new marks and imagery. Many times these initial investigations look chaotic and they provide a problem for me to resolve. I impose order through geometric forms and color, while making connections through lines, written explanations, and collage elements. My work is often detailed and visually appealing, and I hope that it draws people in and causes them to enjoy the process of looking.

"Becoming," cyanotype, gouache, colored pencil,   2014

“Becoming,” cyanotype, gouache, colored pencil, 24″x30″ 2014

"Westminster Ct.: Appearances Can be Deceiving," silkscreen and colored pencil on layers of frosted mylar, 20"x30" 2014

“Westminster Ct.: Appearances Can be Deceiving,” silkscreen and colored pencil on layers of frosted mylar, 20″x30″ 2014

Check back later in the week to read about Ellie’s creative process in Inside the Artist’s Studio with Ellie Honl: Part II.

You can see more of Ellie’s artwork on her website at www.elliehonl.com. Stop by to see three of her pieces (including one honorable mention!) in our current juried exhibition, Structurally Speaking.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by architectural painter Susan Stuart.

Q & A with Kala Stein

The Upstate New York Ceramics Invitational at Main Street Arts will feature functional and sculptural ceramic work by 13 artists from the region. This invitational represents some of the most exciting contemporary ceramic work being made in upstate New York.

The exhibition will be held July 11–August 29, 2015.
Online purchasing will begin in mid-July.

Kala Stein

Canadice ceramic artist Kala Stein

Kala Stein

Q: Where are you from originally and where are you now?
A: I am originally from Springwater, NY and relocated throughout the east in my late teens and twenties when I was studying ceramics. I returned to the Finger Lakes area when I began graduate school at the NYS College of Ceramics at Alfred University.  I now live in Canadice, NY in a refurbished 1959 sleep away camp that my husband and I operate as summer vacation rentals. Link: Woodland Retreat

Q: When did you realize you wanted to be a ceramic artist?
A: When I was studying graphic design at SUNY New Paltz I missed the labor and dirt-under-the-finger-nails, back to the land, lifestyle I had grown up with, on a small homestead in Springwater, NY. I found this type of work and intensity in the ceramics studio where the magic of throwing a bowl from a couple of pounds of clay seemed aligned with the wonder of growing food from seed or raising livestock. The collective experience of the ceramics studio was intellectually and socially engaging for me and by my junior year in college I was at the point of no return.

Q: Did you make other types of artwork before finding ceramics? Do you currently make other work?
A: I am working on designing and building a small, efficient home with my husband. It is a work in progress where we have incorporated reclaimed materials, hand-harvested and milled woods, sensitivity to the landscape and sustainable lifestyle.

Q: Do you have an artistic hero or an artist you look up to?
A: 
There are so many! I especially admire Betty Woodman and her work not only as a pioneering female artist but also as a world traveler and recognized master craftsman and avant-garde thinker.

Q: What is your largest source of inspiration?
A: I am inspired by many, many outside sources of natural beauty, antiquities, and timeless design but ideas really flow for me when I am able to focus in the studio for lengths of time, analyze my work, and visualize new moves and directions to explore. There is no other inspiration or motivation like this- when momentum is in motion, time falls away, and ideas flow freely.

Q: Do you look forward to opening the kiln? Or do you wince at the thought of something going wrong in there?
A: Both!  Clay is full of dualities and surprises. The kiln is the physical manifestation of this. Before I open the kiln, if there is nothing to wonder or worry about, I know I am not my pushing my work or myself as I should.

Q: What is it like being a ceramic artist in Upstate NY?
A: Being a ceramic artist in Western NY is at once lonely and full of company. I am an anomaly in my community because I have a rural studio in a small town, I share this position with Robin Whiteman whose studio is next door. Since I am linked with clay artists in Rochester, Buffalo, Canandaigua, Corning, Syracuse, Alfred, and everywhere in between, I always have a support network and inspiring acquaintances.

Q: Is there anything strange or unique that people might not know about you?
A: I am an obsessive multi-tasker and proponent of efficient, careful, conscious existence. Something else people don’t know about me–I lived in a teepee the first 6 months of my life in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia!

Kala Stein

Kala Stein

Kala Stein

Kala Stein

Kala Stein

Kala Stein

Where can people see more of your work/follow you?
Website: www.kalastein.com
Instagram: @kalasteindesign
Summer Vacation Rentals: Woodland Retreat

Check out the previous Q & A with ceramic artist Jody Selin.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Susan Stuart

It was while doing graduate work at the University at Albany that the size of my studio space influenced my painting.

Susan Stuart Painting Detail

Photography By Rob O’Neil

As a part time student, I was not provided with a studio so I had to use a small room at home. Because I wanted to paint large works, I began sectioning my work, making both diptychs and triptychs.

Susan Stuart Painting Studio

Photography By Rob O’Neil

I earned my MA from the University in 1976, and, over the years I graduated from the small room at home to a studio in a friend’s basement, and eventually to a space of my own on the 3rd floor of an old factory. It was perfectly situated halfway between my house and the high school where I taught for 33 years. Now, with a ground floor studio in a building adjacent to the old factory building, I’m able to easily create and transport large works.

Susan Stuart Painting Studio

Photography By Rob O’Neil

I’m retired from teaching, and I‘m fortunate to be able to focus
full-time on my painting, which currently has an emphasis on two different series. One is architectural and the other features dogs. For the Main Street Gallery exhibition, “Structurally Speaking”, I am showing a painting from my architecture series.

Gunner and Painting

Photography By Susan Stuart

My interest in architecture began in the mid 1970’s when my husband and I moved into a 19th century row house in Albany. We began the process of renovating our historic home, and we lived in the house during the renovation. It was at that time that I began to appreciate the aesthetics of new building materials. For example, there were patterns of light and shadow cast on the two by fours, and there was a rhythm created by the shapes of the construction material and the resulting spaces.

Architectural Paintings and Inspiration

Photography By Rob O’Neil

Originally, my architectural paintings were of structures in my environment: lifeguard stands at the beach, supports to the roadway overpasses, as well as the facades of buildings in and around Albany. Following the 2008 recession I began a series inspired by structures I found at abandoned construction sites. The result has been paintings that stress the lines, shapes, spaces and patterns of light that I observed at those sites.

I see my paintings as a way to ”recycle” these deserted sites. Today, I continue to be captivated by the challenge of abstracting and creating architectural paintings from new and abandoned sites alike.

Susan Stuart Painting in Studio

Photography By Rob O’Neil

The painting process is also an integral part of my work, and the subjective use of color is an important element. To create a rich surface for a painting, I use both wet and dry pigments, which is a direct influence from 19th century French impressionists. The intermixing of pastels, oil paint, and occasionally pumice, allows me to create a contrast in the color’s intensity and value, as well as providing an enhanced surface texture.

Susan Stuart Painting in Studio

Photography By Rob O’Neil

For more information on Susan Stuart’s artwork, visit her website at www.susanstuart.com. Her painting, “Let It Go” won Director’s Choice in our current exhibition, Structurally Speaking. Stop by Main Street Arts to enjoy the show and see Susan’s artwork.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by Rochester painter Jean K. Stephens.

Q & A with Jody Selin

The Upstate New York Ceramics Invitational at Main Street Arts will feature functional and sculptural ceramic work by 13 artists from the region. This invitational represents some of the most exciting contemporary ceramic work being made in upstate New York.

The exhibition will be held July 11–August 29, 2015.
Online purchasing will begin in mid-July.

Jody Selin

Buffalo ceramic artist Jody Selin

Jody Selin

Q: Where are you from originally and where are you now?
A: Originally from Greensboro, North Carolina. I lived in Florida for ten years before moving to Rochester to attend graduate school. I now live in Buffalo, New York.

Q: When did you realize you wanted to be a ceramic artist?
A: I never really realized it. It was a natural progression an attraction to working with the material.

Q: Did you make other types of artwork before finding ceramics? Do you currently make other work?
A: Yes, I draw, paint and do some printmaking in addition to using clay.

Q: Do you have an artistic hero or an artist you look up to?
A: I admire many, many, artists both historic and contemporary, mainly for an interesting idea, technique or skill.

Q: What is your largest source of inspiration?
A: Biological sciences both macro and micro.

Q: Do you look forward to opening the kiln? Or do you wince at the thought of something going wrong in there?
A: Yes, I look forward to it. I usually expect something to not go as planned, but with the idea that I will learn something.

Q: What is it like being a ceramic artist in Upstate NY?
A: It’s a great community of artists.

Sculpture by Jody Selin

Sculpture by Jody Selin

Sculpture by Jody Selin

Sculpture by Jody Selin

Sculpture by Jody Selin

Sculpture by Jody Selin

Sculpture by Jody Selin

Sculpture by Jody Selin

Where can people see more of your work/follow you?
Website: www.jodyselin.com

Check out the previous Q & A with ceramic artist Jeremy Randall.

Q & A with Jeremy Randall

The Upstate New York Ceramics Invitational at Main Street Arts will feature functional and sculptural ceramic work by 13 artists from the region. This invitational represents some of the most exciting contemporary ceramic work being made in upstate New York.

The exhibition will be held July 11–August 29, 2015.
Online purchasing will begin in mid-July.

Jeremy Randall

Tully ceramic artist Jeremy Randall

Jeremy Randall

Q: Where are you from originally and where are you now?
A: I grew up in Syracuse NY, and returned to CNY in 2005 after Grad School.  I am about 1/2 hr south of Syracuse in Tully NY.

Q: When did you realize you wanted to be a ceramic artist?
A: I found clay in High School, and knew that I was interested in the way the material worked.  I have always been engaged with 2D work, but there was something about the idea of use that interested

Q: Did you make other types of artwork before finding ceramics? Do you currently make other work?
A: I wouldn’t say that I make other work, but drawing is definitely a part of my studio practice, and painting has shown up now and again in some of my side projects.

Q: Do you have an artistic hero or an artist you look up to?
A: Mark Pharis, and Jean Michelle Basquiat

Q: What is your largest source of inspiration?
A: Rural Architecture, Objects, and structures that talk about utillity and use, as well as surfaces that show the stain of age, use, and environment.

Q: Do you look forward to opening the kiln? Or do you wince at the thought of something going wrong in there?
A: I always love kiln openings.  To be able to see the development of surface and color is why Im drawn to what I do.

Q: What is it like being a ceramic artist in Upstate NY?
A: I love CNY, the landscape, and the rural spaces are constant joy and inspiration to me.

Q: Where else are you showing your work this summer or fall?
A: I’ll be showing at the NCECA gallery expo with the Gandee Gallery, I’ll have a two person show at Crimson Laurel in July, Red Lodge Clay Center and the Craft Boston show in the fall, the Clay Studio, and Society of Arts and Crafts in Boston.

Q: Is there anything strange or unique that people might not know about you?
A: I keep Chickens and play Old Time banjo.  I also love road cycling and wrenching on Bikes.

Artwork by Tully ceramic artist Jeremy Randall

Flat Cups by Jeremy Randall

Green Window Sill Vase by Jeremy Randall

Green Window Sill Vase by Jeremy Randall

House Boxes by Jeremy Randall

House Boxes by Jeremy Randall

Bottle by Jeremy Randall

Bottle by Jeremy Randall

Basket by Jeremy Randall

Basket by Jeremy Randall

Where can people see more of your work/follow you?
Website: www.jeremyrandallceramics.com
Facebook: jeremy randall ceramics
Instagram: @randallceramics
Twitter: @randallceramics

Check out the previous Q & A with ceramic artist Joanna Poag.