Inside the Artist’s Studio with Dale Klein

My studio at the Hungerford Building and my etching press

My studio at the Hungerford Building and my etching press

My name is Dale Klein and I am a printmaker and painter. I was born in Buffalo and live and work in Rochester, NY. For 25 years I was a clinical social worker, but I have always been interested in the arts. In 2002 I went back to school and earned a BS in studio art from Nazareth in 2006. In 2010 I received an MFA from Rutgers. I moved back to Rochester in 2011 and have a studio in the Hungerford Building. I also teach at the Creative Workshop at the Memorial Art Gallery.

Lawnmower and Afghan, Aquatint, 18"x12" 2006

Lawnmower and Afghan, Aquatint, 18″x12″ 2006

At Nazareth I was drawn to printmaking because it involves a combination of process and creativity. One of my favorite processes is aquatint, which is how I get the tones in my etchings. This is a process in which I start out with a metal plate (zinc or copper) and progressively dip it into a corrosive acid or salt to etch the plate. The plate is then inked, wiped and printed. I also do  relief (woodcut and linocut), monoprints, and collagraphs.

Chain Link Fence, Aquatint, 18"x12" 2015

Chain Link Fence, Aquatint, 18″x12″ 2015

A sense of the place is essential to my work. My primary interest is in the post-industrial landscape in Western New York State. I see it as a metaphor for the entropy that is inevitable in our world. I am influenced by the Precisionist painters of the early 20th century, Charles Sheeler, Ralston Crawford, and Charles Demuth. There is an irony in their optimism about the industrial revolution that has left us in the developed world with so much detritus, which I find both melancholic and beautiful. I tend to work on the boundary of realism and abstraction. I like the viewer to bring their own preconceptions to the work.

Underpass II Aquatint and Collage 18"x12" 2015

Underpass II Aquatint and Collage 18″x12″ 2015

At Rutgers, I was encouraged to paint and now I paint also. I find that my painting informs my printmaking and vice versa. I have painted in oils for the last few years, but lately have experimented with acrylics. I paint on canvas and wood panels.

Untitled Oil on Canvas 72"x57" 2009

Untitled Oil on Canvas 72″x57″ 2009

Composition I Acrylic on Canvas 36"x48" 2016

Composition I Acrylic on Canvas 36″x48″ 2016

Besides the House and Home exhibit at Main Street Arts I have a piece in the show Echoes of the Past at the University Gallery at RIT, up until August 12. My studio is open most First Fridays, the Hungerford building, 1115 East Main St., Studio 250, 6-9 PM. Please come and visit.


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Dale Klein’s prints in our current exhibition House and Home (runs through August 19). View her work online at www.dalekleinart.com and follow her on Instagram @daleklein7.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by sculptor Andrea Scofield Olmstead.

Meet the Artist in Residence: Evan Tagmeyer

Evan Tagmeyer is an artist in residence at Main Street Arts! He’s working in one of our two studio spaces during the month of July 2016 (you can stop by the gallery to see his studio and work in progress). We asked Evan a few questions about his artwork, life, and more:

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Q: To start this off, would you tell us about your background?

A: I am a professional artist living and working in the suburbs of Philadelphia (more specifically Lansdale township). For the past six years I have been an art student. I first attended Bucks County Community College where I received my Associates Degree in Fine Arts. I then transferred into University of the Arts where I received my Bachelor of Fine Arts with an emphasis in painting.

Q: What was your experience like at art school?

A: To say that my three years at University of the Arts was the time of my life would be an understatement. I met and made wonderful relationships with individuals whom I know will continue their creative endeavors and will hopefully stay in touch. I never painted before University of the Arts and my sophomore year I became very aware that this medium was something that I found fascinating.

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Q: How would you describe your work?

A: To put it simply I paint in the dark. I use dark interiors that slow down the viewers understanding as well as my own of space and form. As of late, I have been painting still life and interior space paintings of my home and studio.  Along with interior space paintings I have been creating still life paintings of objects that define me personally.

Evan Tagmeyer, "Still Life at Night", oil on canvas, 22" x 16", 2015

Evan Tagmeyer, “Still Life at Night”, oil on canvas, 22″ x 16″, 2015

Evan Tagmeyer, "Bedroom with Dresser", oil on canvas, 12" x 9", 2015

Evan Tagmeyer, “Bedroom with Dresser”, oil on canvas, 12″ x 9″, 2015

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?

A: Recently, I have been interested in painting medical devices that are thrown about with other objects or placed in a certain way to alter or hinder their usage. My still life paintings I set up by placing the objects in a makeshift box that I than cover with a screen to give the illusion of darkness. My interior space paintings I start by taking multiple photos of the space, I then begin to alter how they are viewed before I begin to paint through my computer. I push the lights and darks in the photos and than I recreate the image through paint.

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Q: What are your goals for the residency?

A: Because I am a young, emerging artist my goals for this residency are to first and foremost to create more work in a professional environment, while also building professional relationships and connections to help further my career.

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Q: What’s next for you?

A: After my residency is complete I will be returning back home to Pennsylvania to see family and friends. After my return I plan to keep creating artwork and look for gallery representation near me.

Q: Where else can we find you?

A: You can visit my website at www.evantagmeyer.com.


Are you an artist looking for new opportunities? Apply for a residency at Main Street Arts! Artists in residence will have 24-hour access to a large studio on our second floor (with great natural light), the option to show work in the gallery, and the opportunity to teach paid workshops. Submissions are reviewed and awarded on an ongoing basis.

Meet the Artist in Residence: Victoria Lee Connors

Victoria Connors is an artist in residence at Main Street Arts! She’s working in one of our two studio spaces July through August 2016 (you can stop by the gallery to see her studio and work in progress). We asked Victoria a few questions about her artwork, life, and more:

Q: To start this off, would you tell us about your background?

A: I am originally from Rochester, NY, but have lived all over the Finger lakes from Canandaigua to the Ithaca area. I’ve always enjoyed the creative process starting with my first painting at the age of two.  I have been an oil painter most of my life, painting local landscapes as well as making some surreal art. I was first introduced to fiber arts while making felted hats in the Rochester area, and I learned about needle felting while volunteering in Rochester in 2014. I went to a  needle felting demo and the rest is history. By the winter of 2015 my main focus became needle felt paintings, as I feel this is my calling.

Felt painting by Victoria Connors

Q: How would you describe your work?

A: I like to see my work as a reflection of the connection I have with nature.  I find inspiration in chasing sunsets and exploring the Finger Lakes region.  I started doing more plein air felting to capturing the beauty in nature that I experience. You can’t get any more of a natural medium than wool and alpaca.

Victoria Connors felting in nature

Victoria Connors felting in nature

Felting gives a sense of texture and depth that couldn’t be captured in oil paint.  My felt paintings are a combination of 2D and 3D art elements, giving my artwork its own unique look and texture.  I enjoy felting as it’s more forgiving than oil painting, but more tedious when it comes to details and color palette.

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?

A: One of the most important parts of my process is experiencing a beautiful moment to capture. I often drive around the Finger Lakes for hours looking for a lovely place to plein air felt.  If it’s somewhere I’m unable to felt (such as an abandoned building) then it’s safer to take a picture. I go into much more detail of my felt painting in my Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post!

Q: What are your goals for this residency? Tell us about your current projects.

A: My biggest goal to is help bring fiber arts into the spot light. I feel like fiber art is just starting to enter the mainstream art world. I plan to host another felt painting landscape class.  I also plan to take full advantage of this space and work on large scale felt paintings and more 3D sculptures.

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I have a few surreal felt paintings I am working on as well.  With these I plan to push my limits with relief needle felting.

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Q: What’s next for you?

A: I have several art festivals lined up for this year and plan to eventually expand out of state. I will be at Sonnenberg Arts in the  Garden and Clothesline Arts Festival. Next year I’m planning on showing at more art festivals and galleries around the Philadelphia area. I have recently worked on some art installations that will be on display at the Finger Lakes Grassroots Music Fest.

Victoria Connors leading a felting workshop at Main Street Arts. More workshops with Victoria will be announced soon!

Victoria Connors led an exciting felting workshop at Main Street Arts. More workshops with Victoria will be announced soon!

Q: Where can we find you?

You can view my work online at www.victoriaconnors.com, on Facebook as Victoria Connors Felt Art, and on Instagram @victoria_connors_feltart. You can see my upcoming show announcements on my website and Facebook.


Are you an artist looking for new opportunities? Apply for a residency at Main Street Arts! Artists in residence will have 24-hour access to a large studio on our second floor (with great natural light), the option to show work in the gallery, and the opportunity to teach paid workshops. Submissions are reviewed and awarded on an ongoing basis.