Inside the Artist’s Studio with Lacey McKinney

Lacey working in her studio

Lacey working in her studio

I am so happy to be included in the Upstate New York Painting Invitational at Main Street Arts. The paintings in the show are demonstrative of a new body of work that I started working on this summer.

Paper photo collage sketches posted on the studio wall

I am experimenting with a different formal approach by making paper collages to use as source material for paintings.

A finished oil painting on polyester film hangs above two preliminary collages

Concepts that coalesce to form a continuing thread throughout my years of painting are still present in this work. For instance, social issues, feminism, and themes relating to bodily experience emerge during my process.

An acrylic ground acts as a beginning base for oil paint

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Detail of a larger painting shows texture

Richness of surface is important. This allows a physical engagement to take place where visceral connection engenders empathy. Oil paint is such an appropriate medium for this since it is used to mimic flesh throughout the history of painting.

To see more of my work, connect with me on social media (Instagram, Facebook and Twitter) and to sign up for my email newsletter, visit my website at: www.lacey-mckinney.com


Stop by Main Street Arts to see three of Lacey’s paintings included int he Upstate New York Painting Invitational. The exhibition runs through October 7, 2017. Lacey’s work from the show is also available for purchase in our online gallery shop: store.mainstreetartsgallery.com

Lacey will also be one of the artists participating in a closing artists talk for the exhibition on Saturday, October 7 at 2 p.m.

 

From The Director: Hanging Jewelry on The Wall

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From the DirectorA series that offers a behind-the-scenes look at the exhibitions and events that take place at Main Street Arts, as well as insight from the director’s perspective on the artwork and artists featured.


A grouping of work in Multifaceted

Multifaceted exhibition, a view from the second room

As with all of our exhibitions, I have been looking forward to installing our current show, Multifaceted: An Exhibition of Fine Jewelry. One of the greatest thrills of curating and hanging an exhibition is in the process of laying out the work and going through the different possibilities for making the exhibition the best version of what it could be. So many variations of the same exhibition exist prior to making the final decisions to make THE exhibition.

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Preparing for installation…

I knew it would be a challenge to install jewelry, especially since we wanted to put as much as possible directly on the wall. One of the main concerns was making sure the exhibition would adequately fill the space. When all of the work was taken out of boxes and bags, it was all able to fit on a table and a hand full of pedestals—I started to get a little nervous! However, as pieces started to be set in place, we could see that we had enough work. Our next concern was that we didn’t want the individual pieces to get lost on the large walls of the gallery. Painting a variety of circles in a muted blue helped to give context to jewelry groupings and provided a rhythm to the wall as a whole.

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Trays, bowls, vases, and other circular objects proved helpful when painting circles! Pictured: Necklaces by Boo Poulin and a brooch by Juan Carlos Caballero-Perez

We also used mirrors, painted with a metallic gold, to add another dimensional element to the layout. As you pass by the sections with mirrors, you notice something moving in your periphery and—I hope—it causes you to stop and look closer at the surrounding collection of jewelry. They also serve a practical purpose in this exhibition, since most of the work in this show is made to be worn.

Multifaceted Installation shot, with mirrors.

Multifaceted Installation shot, with mirrors.

Ultimately, I wanted to do this exhibition to change the context of how we look at jewelry. My hope is for people to experience these pieces as if they were looking at painting or sculpture and spend time considering the meaning behind the work. The jewelry is out of its usual case in the gallery shop and is taking its rightful place on the walls and on pedestals of the gallery—seen as the works of art that they are.

Stop in to experience the exhibition in person before it closes this Friday, August 18.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Colleen Griffin-Underhill

It is such a treat to be asked to write about my work!  It’s always been somewhat secretive and secondary in my life but I’m thrilled to be letting it shine a bit in the exhibit at Main Street Arts.

silo w orange in process

Silo with orange in process

After 15 years as the buyer and manager of the lovely Gallery Store at MAG, I am now the GM of Hart’s Local Grocers—plus the mom of 2 boys and a compulsive furniture re-arranger.  Sometimes I joke that I run the grocery store in my free time but the reality of course is that it is typically the other way around. I’ve learned to take good notes when inspiration comes flying at me and to allow the whole process to ebb and flow as time and life allows.

Making things and playing with color makes me tick.  Putting paint on a brush and playing with how it flows and mixes with other hues is just heart-racing exciting for me.

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Brushes

When my boys were very little, the paintings and collages I had been making for many years became too time (and space) consuming.  Around that time I started making polymer clay shapes and beads to paint. Working in small chunks of time moving back and forth between just painting and then composing the finished pieces later, gave me the time to focus on what I wanted; mixing patterns, pushing color play and finding a rhythm to the way shapes work together.

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Pallettes

About 4 years ago I started learning to work with metals and integrating sterling silver components into the work. I’ll continue to explore where this goes as I practice more metal-smithing.  Adding something new—a tool, material or a thing in my head that kicks in and gives me a new way of working, feeds my creative process.

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My new studio space

This body of work is the most I ever made in one burst.  Early this year we moved our 11 year old up to the attic and this spare room became my studio space.  It has been such a luxury to start and stop freely and to sneak in there before work or late at night when everyone sleeps.  Keeping the work breathing and spread out before me each day allowed me to push into new realms and build off of earlier concepts to fully enjoy the design process.

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Studio sketch

So much of what was in my sketchbooks came to life this year including the “drills” pattern featured on many items.  In planning our summer garden I found myself thinking about rows of holes for seeds… the boys probably dropping two in here and 12 in there and the dots kept creeping into my sketchbook, some larger, some smaller for seed size.  The dots wander around this work I’ve made and the garden never happened…so it goes.

drills brooch in process

Drills brooch in process

I’m always fascinated and eager to see the artist’s hand in their work.  I try to celebrate that and I never worry too much about the imperfections that happen along the way.   The process of creating plus the thrill of seeing my work worn and worked into a someone’s personal style is what keeps me making it.

My work is sold at Main Street Arts, MAG, Andrea Geer Designs and occasionally on my website — ceegeeu.com.


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Colleen’s work in our current exhibition “Multifaceted: An Exhibition of Fine Jewelry” through August 18, 2017. Colleen’s work from the exhibition is also available for purchase in our online gallery shop: store.mainstreetartsgallery.com

Meet the Artist in Residence: Hunter Zelner

Hunter Zelner is one of our current artists in residence at Main Street Arts. During the month of August, 2017, she will be exploring the notion of place and memory through small landscape paintings while also continuing a series of figure-based works. We asked Hunter a few questions about her artwork and studio practice. 

Hunter Zelner

Hunter Zelner

Q: Tell us about your background.
I am Arizona born and raised and have spent my life there save for a brief stint in Oregon. I don’t remember a time when I wasn’t tinkering, making, and more specifically painting. I was fortunate to have an arts high school in the area so I went there. Once I hit college I scrambled through just about every major known to man and in the end received my degree in Art History at ASU. I joke but in all seriousness I was the queen of overrides and managed to take mostly studio classes and still ended up with an Art History degree.

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Wolf Skin, oil on canvas, 28in x 56in

Q: How would you describe your work?
Depicting the dichotomy of visceral meat, a still unmoving form surrounding humanity within has been the primary interest of my work.

Early on in my artistic career a teacher asked the students “Have you ever seen a dead body?” That question stuck with me. She went on to explain that as a figurative painter the trick is to put a person behind the eyes. I want to paint a shell with a person behind the eyes. For this reason I primarily paint people I know. I have worked in metal sculpture, oil painting, acrylic painting, and most recently taxidermy. I always go back to oil paint.

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Sister Ursuline, oil on canvas, 18in x 36in

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
I am a very structured painter…sometimes to my chagrin. I typically come up with a concept, research until I can’t see straight, put the basics together in Photoshop to work out the kinks, grid my surface, underpaint, and then finally get to actually laying on the final image.

Q: What are your goals for the residency?
Like most people coming to the residency I want time and space to work. Life is wonderful but also full of so many distractions. I am looking forward to building better and more consistent work habits.

Currently I am working on a departure from my otherwise figurative work. It’s a series about place and memory but in short paintings of parking lots, alley, stairs, empty pool, etc. at night. I am curious about taking time to document otherwise transitionary places that I might forget. Beyond that, I am planning two larger figurative pieces, and some portraits for the time I am at the residency.

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Landscape, oil on canvas, 5in x 7in

Q: Do you collect anything?
Yes, I have always been a collector. I like a bit of clutter when I paint and in my life as a whole. I collect a lot of random things but some of my larger collections include mounted insects, antique and vintage ephemera, and wall art. At this point I am actually running out of wall space at home.

Tucker, oil on panel, 12in x 48in

Tucker, oil on panel, 12in x 48in

Q: What advice would you give to other artists?
Lean into your mistakes. As a representational artist I have spent a lot of time fighting the standard of being a human photocopier. There are people with the innate ability to duplicate exactly what they see or those who have spent years learning old masters’ methods. Some of my favorite artists work that way, nothing against it but you are the only one who can “make” exactly like you and the mistakes you make are yours. Fight the urge to start over or cover them and try making them part of your work.

Hunter Zelner in her studio at Main Street Arts

Hunter Zelner in her studio at Main Street Arts

Q: What’s next for you?
After the residency I will be applying for a MFA in Painting. I am glad I took time between Undergraduate and Graduate School but am ready to be immersed again… hense my applying to the residency.

Q: Where else can we find you?https://www.instagram.com/hunterzelner/
http://www.hunterzelner.com/


Hunter is teaching a workshop on painting hands (something many painters struggle with!) on Saturday, August 19 from 12 to 3 p.m. at Main Street Arts. Sign up on our website to reserve your spot!

Meet the Artist in Residence: Emily Long

Emily Long is one of our current artists in residence at Main Street Arts. During the month of August, 2017, she will be exploring new mediums and working on a series that explores the idea that everything is fluid and connected—finding commonalities and relationships between ourselves and our surrounding that inevitably confirm our greater humanity. We asked Emily a few questions about her artwork and studio practice. 

Emily Long

Emily Long

Q: Tell us a little bit about your background.
I was born and raised in Staten Island, New York. At an early age I was enrolled in multiple art programs at my local cultural center, Snug Harbor and was constantly creating things at home thanks to the support of my parents. I was fortunate enough to be accepted into an art focused high school in New York City and continued my interest in visual arts and museum studies in undergrad at Fashion Institute of Technology. Beyond creating my own art, I am passionate about art education and currently work for the New York Historical Society (NYHS) and Smithsonian Cooper Hewitt Design Museum.

Q: How would you describe your work?
My art is fluid. I am interested in exploring the relationship between one’s self and their surroundings. A majority of these works are illustrated with watercolor but I am always excited to add a new medium into my work.

Work by Emily Long, water color and ink

“Raw Synergy Recognize Symmetry”, Emily Long

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
For every piece my process is a little different depending on how much time I am able to give myself to create. Some days I will jump right into a watercolor illustration. Other days I will spend hours researching symbols and their significance; taking notes on how they can be added into a work.

Q: What is the most useful tool in your studio?
My primary medium is watercolor, naturally my paintbrushes are my most used and useful tool in my studio.

Emily working in her studio at Main Street Arts

Emily working in her studio at Main Street Arts

Q: Who is your favorite artist and why?
Choosing a favorite artist feels like telling one’s children who the favorite is. With that said, I love Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh for her fearless use of multiple mediums and line use, Gustav Klimt for his use of gold, and Georgia O’Keeffe for her composition and abstraction. My favorite local artist was my childhood neighbor, Andrea Phillips.

Q: What advice would you give other artists?
Just keep working. Don’t be afraid to “waste” your materials or become upset if you create something you do not like. You have to get the “bad” art out before the masterpiece.

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Work by Emily Long: NY Time Dime (left), and Majority Too Big to Ignore (right)

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
I have had a recent interest in working with gesso and printmaking. I am excited to experiment with new mediums and making my work more sculptural while at Main Street Arts Residency. Recent projects have been inspired by folklore and myths. I plan to explore these themes with the exploration of new mediums.  

Q: What’s next for you?
In the fall, I will return to work at the museum. As for my art, I will be turning an old office space into my studio, where I hope to spend most of my free time.

Q: Where else can we find you?
On my website: emilysarahlong.com and on Instagram.


Emily is teaching a crocheted cacti gardens amigurumi workshop on Saturday, August 12 from 12 to 3 p.m. at Main Street Arts. Amigurumi is the Japanese art of crocheting small stuffed creatures/objects. Sign up on our website to reserve your spot!

Inside The Artist’s Studio: Erica Bapst

Erica Bapst Profile

I consider myself a bit of a plate spinner. I always have a great multitude of projects in the air. It is a precarious balancing act I perform on a daily basis while running my boutique, Adorn Jewelry and Accessories, in Canandaigua NY. I always laugh and apologize to my customers because my workspace rarely stays confined to the actual designated studio behind the curtain. The designing process, works in progress, tools, random bits and pieces, all spill over into checkout area. I’m sure to many, it looks as though those “plates” I like to spin have all dropped and smashed to bits. More often than not the customers seem to love having the chance to see all the different projects I have going on in their various states. (Or perhaps they only like to peek behind the counter to say “hi” to my constant companion Penny, my shop dog —I am never entirely sure…;)

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Ok, let’s rewind a bit — how did it all start? I have an AAS in Graphic Design from Finger Lakes Community College (1998) and a BFA in Metalsmithing from Syracuse University (2001). I honestly have to say that my time in graphic design has always influenced my work, particularly during the initial layout process. I tend to create most of my layouts and templates using Adobe Illustrator. Because my jewelry is what stocks my store, I am often very focused on creating elements that have a consistency people depend on. Creating the templates allows me to easily reproduce, for example, a specific set of Ginkgo leaves.

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I hand form these ginkgo leaves from brass sheet in bulk.

The invite to this wonderful exhibit at Main Street Arts has given me the chance to step back from the day-to-day routine of creating jewelry for the retail world. I was able to expand upon my favorite body of work and experiment with the form and structure. It was so much fun having a reason to push my boundaries slightly. I am the type of person that often feels guilty if I take time to experiment. I fear that if the piece did not work out,  those precious moments would have been wasted. Running the shop leaves no minute of the day unaccounted for. Being a part of this show was such a luxury to be able to hit pause on my overly sensible brain and create with a sense of freedom!

Here are some progress shots of the piece I had the most fun with.

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I really wanted to design something that felt as ancient as the Ginkgo itself. So I dug into my memories of the historical jewelry I have seen over the years in different museums. Gazing at jewelry that is thousands of years old always mesmerizes me. I could stare at the ancient pieces for hours, puzzling over the stories of how they were made, who they adorned, and how they came to be in front of my eyes. I wanted to take this opportunity to pay homage to those works — jewelry created impossibly long ago from a single ingot, with rudimentary tools  and incorporated rough stone, clay or glass elements.

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While I was not interested in starting from my own cast ingot of brass, I opted to start with a pre-formed sheet…the advantages of our age. Then I searched my vast collection of stones (seriously, my family thinks I am a hoarder when it comes to stones and beads…I am beginning to agree with them) and came across this great slab of seriphinite that I have been hanging on to for a few years waiting for the right moment.  This was the time.

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My favorite shot of this piece.

Some of you may be asking at this point,  “What is with the Ginkgo theme?”  I have had the store for 13 years and have heard a lot of personal stories — stories of bravery,  heartbreak, of illness and also of the people who heal and comfort those who have been through it all.  I would listen to these stories and later think to myself, “ugh…and what do I do? — sit here and make jewelry, what good is that to anyone?”  Then little by little I began to notice that the reason I was hearing these stories was because my customers were often coming in to purchase my pieces to lift the spirits of someone going through a tough time, or to celebrate overcoming a difficult situation. I knew I was not a person that truly helps or heals, but if there was some small way I could contribute to others through my work, I wanted to with all my heart.

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I searched for a theme that carried with it a powerful sentiment and could be translated in many ways. So I looked to nature which I love so dearly, for inspiration. I was walking to work and pouring over my thoughts on the subject, and a leaf dropped off of my neighbor’s tree in front of me. I realized right then that the Ginkgo would be my symbol. It fit perfectly.

With every jewelry piece I include the words:

“The Ginkgo has existed for 250 million years, unwavering in its uniqueness and beauty. They naturally resist the negative and are survivors against all odds.

May we be like the ginkgo and carry with us the strength, resilience and natural beauty that resides within. “

It is not much in the grand scheme of things, but I create each and every leaf with as much love as possible in hopes that the love will carry through to the wearer.

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Sterling silver, aquamarine and quartz branch earrings

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A little surprise on the back.

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This Labradorite is what dreams are made of.

This Labradorite is what dreams are made of.

After the show at Main Street Arts, you can find me at AdornJewelryAndAccessories.com,  on Instagram @EricaBapst or on Facebook.

PS—If you get the chance after visiting Main Street Arts, head east up Main and visit the grand Ginkgo Grove that are a little piece of Clifton Springs History!

My Daughter and I visited the trees after the opening of the exhibit.

My Daughter and I visited the trees after the opening of the exhibit.


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Erica’s work in our current exhibition “Multifaceted: An Exhibition of Fine Jewelry” through August 18, 2017. Erica’s work from the exhibition is also available for purchase in our online gallery shop: store.mainstreetartsgallery.com