Meet the Artist in Residency: Andrew Palladino

Andrew Palladino

Andrew Palladino

Q: Please you tell us about your background?
I am a Boston based printmaking artist, I recently graduated with a BFA in printmaking from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.  I’ve been making art for about the past five years now but my time printing goes further back than that. Before MassArt I attended vocational school for production commercial printing, specializing in offset lithography and silkscreen.

Empty in the Cave, Intaglio, 12.5x23.5in, 2018

Empty in the Cave, Intaglio, 12.5×23.5in, 2018

Q: How would you describe your work?
A majority of my current work is etchings and silkscreen prints. My prints are abstractions working off of maps and diagrams. I use observation and pre-existing information to create completely impossible forms and uninterpretable figures. I look at things very analytically yet display them with more open readings, swinging the real into my own pieces of art.

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
I work heavily with layering, the pieces build themselves that way. I make a lot of components in a drawing that may not even appear in the final print, but the contribution to the overall drawing is important to me. The image builds and thickens, usually to the point of being over-done, but that really shows how my mind works while creating. I tend to get fixated on my work and bring it past the point where my initial intention would be to stop.

Margin Treader, Intaglio, 12x8in, 2017

Margin Treader, Intaglio, 12x8in, 2017

Q: What are your goals for this residency? 
This residency for me is most about experimentation. I’m mostly looking to get as many things on paper in different ways. While I normally publish works in formal editions I want to stray from keeping things looking uniform and really just take some time to print and collage and reprint.

Untitled, Intaglio with Chine Colle, 12x8in, 2018

Untitled, Intaglio with Chine Colle, 12x8in, 2018

Q: Who are some of your favorite artists? 
My favorite artists currently are people like John Walker, Terry Winters, Anselm Kiefer, and Julie Mehrutu. They all demonstrate the ability to tackle small marks translating into extremely larger compositions, which is something that captivates me when looking at art.

Q: Do you collect artwork? 
I have a small collection of other artists’ works, I really only limit myself to things I could show in my home and on my studio walls as opposed to having things locked away in storage. Mostly I just find myself getting pieces from local artist friends back in Boston, though a few works are from artists I did print publishing projects for such as John Walker and Kiki Smith.

I, Intaglio, 5x9in, 2017

I, Intaglio, 5x9in, 2017

Q: What’s next for you? 
Currently, I am building and improving an in-home studio in Boston while making work there. I mostly show around that area as well though always looking to reach out to new spaces.  I would like to venture further onto getting an MFA, but that seems a ways away for me at the moment.

Q: Where else can we find you? 
My website is cargocollective.com/andrewpalladino and you can find me on instagram: @apalladino309

Meet the Artist in Residence: Rachel Siminoski

Rachel Siminoski, artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the month of March 2019, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Rachel some questions about her work and studio practice:

Rachel Siminoski

Rachel Siminoski

Q: Please you tell us about your background.
I grew up in a small town in central Ohio, and after graduating high school I went to the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for my BS in biology. During my sophomore year I decided that as much as I loved science (and still do!), it wasn’t what I wanted to pursue. I graduated with my BFA in drawing and printmaking, worked at an art gallery for a year, and recently I’ve been working for a screen printing company in the Charlotte area. I also started an online art magazine called Reciprocal in 2017, and I’m currently working on the fourth issue.

Rachel's studio

Rachel’s studio

Q: How would you describe your work?
My work stems from my interest in biological systems and the intersection of protection and separation. Most of my paintings depict ambiguous enclosures in which biomorphic and structural forms interact symbiotically. While I’m influenced by various structures that I see on a daily basis (fences, enclosures, walls, etc.), I’m not actively attempting to depict anything from life. I’m more interested in the function that those forms are associated with- such as protecting, covering, holding, or supporting the things around it.

"Octagonal", 2018, acrylic on canvas, 36.25  27 inches

“Octagonal”, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 36.25 x 27 inches


Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
I start with small, simple sketches, although I never feel obligated to stick with my original plan. I like to work on multiple pieces at a time- if I try to focus on just one image, I feel like I end up drowning in ideas that don’t belong crammed together in one single painting. I also like to stop and take a moment to write about what I’m working on, ask myself questions about the decisions I’ve made so far, and gain some clarity on where I want to take the painting next.

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
I’ve been thinking about how things evolve over time, and how the abstract characters and environments within my paintings fit into that idea. I think in the past I’ve thought about each of my paintings as separate, individual representations, whereas now I’m more curious about how they interact in relation to one another, and depicting them in a way that makes them seem less static.

I’ve also been playing with the temperature of the grays that I mix, and I want to explore how I can push that further while still staying true to the parameters that I set for my work. I’m hoping to continue exploring these ideas and make some smaller paintings that will lead to larger works once I get back to my studio in North Carolina.

Per Kirkeby

Per Kirkeby

Q: Who is your favorite artist and why? Who are your favorite local artists?
I really love Per Kirkeby’s paintings. He made sure to emphasize the importance of having structure within a painting, and that has always resonated with me. A few of my favorite North Carolina artists include Felicia van Bork, Marvin Saltzman, and Mariam Stephan.

Untitled, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 28 inches

Untitled, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 28 inches

Q: What was your experience like at art school?
I had an amazing experience in school. My professors were tough yet supportive, and I was surrounded by talented and driven peers. The environment wasn’t competitive in an unhealthy way like I think some people assume.

"Small Enclosure 2", 2018, acrylic on canvas, 8 x 10 inches

“Small Enclosure 2″, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 8 x 10 inches


Q: What’s next for you?
That’s a big question! Hopefully I’ll be attending more residencies later on this year. I’m also starting to think about going back to school for an MFA in painting, so we’ll see where that leads me!

Q: Where else can we find you?
You can find me on instagram, or on my website www.rachelsiminoski.com