Category Archives: Exhibitions

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Tricia Butski

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My studio is based in Buffalo, NY, where I am currently a resident artist at Buffalo Arts Studio. Though my recent work is primarily grounded in drawing, I was trained as a painter and graduated with my BFA in Drawing and Painting from SUNY Fredonia and my MFA from the University at Buffalo.

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Tricia’s studio space at Buffalo Arts Studio

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Tricia’s studio space at Buffalo Arts Studio

Through drawings rendered in charcoal and ink, my recent work examines issues related to memory by exploring its limitations and aestheticizing the instability inherent in portraiture. The work I create allows the viewer to enter the subconscious space between remembering and forgetting. The figures and faces, which have been distorted through a repetitive layering process, manipulate the viewers sense of familiarity. The original image becomes fragmented through this process, a conceptual procedure that corresponds to the experience of forgetting the semblance of the face, the body, and the subject.

'Eclipse' in progress

‘Eclipse’ in progress

The process of arriving at the reference image alternates between analogue and digital techniques. The raw, unaltered source photo is physically manipulated through an additive layering process. Films, ointments, and various substances are applied to the surface of the photograph, each layer removing it one step further from its origin. The image is re-photographed constantly throughout the process as a means of collecting information. Once this analogue process is complete, I continue augmenting and adjusting the images digitally, using layers to create a new level of distortion.

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The image is then rendered in charcoal and charcoal powder using a painterly technique at larger than life scale. During the drawing process, a final transformation emerges as I adjust and reinterpret the reference image. The final image can only be realized through the activity of drawing, which creates a third representation that is neither real nor imagined.

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The medium of charcoal serves as a material analog for impermanence, fragility, and malleability. Charcoal best articulates my thoughts about partiality, longing, preservation, reconstruction and deconstruction, not only for technical and aesthetic reasons, but because of its origin. As the residue of organic animal and vegetation substances, it speaks to the preservation and re-visitation of memory. The medium consists of dead matter that is condensed, preserved, and then reanimated through the drawing process. The dust can be reused over and over. Because it is an easily transferrable substance, the medium itself exerts a level of influence over the mark making process, an intention beyond the limits of my control.

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Through distortion and fragmentation, the figures take on a monstrous form. The familiarity of the face evokes comfort while simultaneously rousing a sense of distress. This creates an intermediary form that inhabits a space both real and imagined. The resulting image is neither entirely original nor fully invented, taking form as a realistic rendering of a fleeting moment. By challenging the boundaries between representation and abstraction, and questioning the relationship between fluctuation and constancy, the works become entangled and disordered, mirroring the viewer’s innate desire for clarity and their proclivity for drawing meaning out of partiality.

To view more of my work visit www.triciabutskiart.com or follow me on Instagram at @triciabutski.art.

 


Tricia Butski is one of six artists featured in the Upstate New York Drawing Invitational at Main Street Arts. Work from the exhibition can be previewed and purchased through the gallery’s Artsy page. The Upstate New York Drawing Invitational runs through September 28, 2018.


 

Inside The Artist’s Studio with Colleen Buzzard

I’ve been making art since the 1980’s.  I began at Reed College in the ceramics studio in my spare time and eventually took some art courses at Boston University and Mass College of Art. When I moved to London, England I was making large scale ceramic installations but with the birth of my second child I made a sharp turn to drawing. I loved the immediacy of work on paper and a process that seemed to have a more direct connection to my thinking.

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One day walking into the studio I had the sensation of walking into my mind. That experience gave rise to a small immersive room I call the Language Lab. A collection of found objects, art works, and drawings create a mix of order and disorder, a place where I look for classification systems and explore the rules and rule-breaking that make language so malleable and expressive.

Language Lab detail

Language Lab detail

Language Lab detail

Language Lab detail

Thinking about language led to musings about how the mind works, about the nature of thinking itself. If we could visualize a train of thought, what would it look like?  Would it be an orderly pattern like a map or a series of tangles? As I worked on these questions by drawing on paper and walls, I felt an urgent need to bring my experiments off flat planes and into the architectural space of the studio. The mysterious threshold between 2D and 3D became an important and enduring focus in my work.

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I use a wide range of materials from ink and graphite to wire, tape, and steel wool. Where possible I like the supporting mechanisms for hanging the work to function also as part of the content of the pieces. Drawn lines morph into scaffolding and reach out toward us. I think of shadows, extant or drawn, as an important element (sometimes the major element) of many pieces. Drawing in space animates the work for me, making it responsive to changing light and air currents rather than capturing a frozen moment.

in the studio

While I work I often wonder what terms like “order,” “information,” and “random” really mean. It is surprising to me that systems are often a wild mix of order and disorder. It turns out that systems that lie on the edge between chaos and order are better able to incorporate diversity and evolve, and are therefore more robust.

studio table with notebook

A touchstone for me is an artwork by Luis Camnitzer called “Two Parallel Lines 1976-2010.” The textual part begins with: “Two parallel lines. The materialization of an abstraction. Line covering the horizon. A shadow of the horizon. Fragment of the curvature of the Earth. Axis of a corner. Narrative…” and ends with: “The slices’s slice. The superstition of territory. Instant defining a victim. Victim. The beginning of a self-portrait.”  (The full text and images can be found here.)

Origin of Matter

Origin of Matter

I like to think of grids, as well as knots, tangles, and scribbles as both mental and physical architecture. In the study of knot theory mathematicians have uncovered clues to the nature of DNA folding and other complex phenomena.

Untitled (dash line)

Untitled (dash line)

My work often circles back to the difference between matter and information.  Are they really two different things or is the distinction just an intellectual convenience?

Colleen Portrail 2017

You can see more of my work on my website at www.colleenbuzzard.com and on Instagram at colleenbuzzardart.


Colleen Buzzard is one of six artists featured in the Upstate New York Drawing Invitational at Main Street Arts. Work from the exhibition can be previewed and purchased through the gallery’s Artsy page. The Upstate New York Drawing Invitational runs through September 28, 2018.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Bill Stephens

I grew up in Lyons NY.  My high school art instructor, Norm Williams was a gifted artist/teacher who was instrumental in my development as an artist.

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Still Life, mixed media, college portfolio piece

On his recommendation, I applied to the prestigious Layton School of Art in Milwaukee WI. The school at that time was under the direction of Edmund Lewandowski, a contemporary of Charles Sheeler and Charles Demuth. Layton’s innovative, strict core curriculum was based on design and provided me with a great foundation to build on. We were supported and encouraged by a gifted staff of working artist instructors.

Upon graduation, I was offered a teaching position at the new Finger Lakes Community College in Canandaigua, NY, where I taught for two years. I received a Masters in Science of Teaching from RIT and taught art for forty years in the Webster CSD.

I had a very successful career, with numerous students receiving national awards and scholarships to leading art schools. Working as an artist alongside my students, sharing artistic successes and failures, I was a positive role model.

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Sketchbook pencil drawing

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Sketchbook pencil drawing

Printmaking, painting, drawing, mixed media and ceramic sculpture are disciplines I’ve explored.

My work is process driven and inspired by morning meditation, writing, memory and my imagination. Each piece is extemporaneously developed and contains open-ended symbols that encourage personal interpretation and reflection.

The house, window, and barn symbols have appeared in my work for many years.

House grid, series of paintings, acrylic on board

The Village, acrylic on paper

I am also exploring a series of drawings using abstract, organic form. The pen drawings in this show are cubist inspired and playful.

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Hive, pen on paper

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Village, pen on paper


Bill Stephens is one of six artists featured in the Upstate New York Drawing Invitational at Main Street Arts. Work from the exhibition can be previewed and purchased through the gallery’s Artsy page. The Upstate New York Drawing Invitational runs through September 28, 2018.

 

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Phyllis Bryce Ely: Not My Father’s Iceberg

Joseph Loder Bryce

Joseph Loder Bryce

I began painting this series after the loss of my father, Joseph Loder Bryce, in 2015.

Loder served in the US Navy as a photographer aboard the Icebreaker USS Edisto in the early 1950s during the cold war era. His ship supported the installation of the Distant Early Warning Line (DEW Line) in the Arctic region with a mission to dramatically reduce the warning time of possible Soviet attack. The DEW Line, along the 69th parallel, was the northernmost radar system, taking my father into the Arctic region with his camera to photograph sea and air missions, life aboard the ship, and the extreme beauty of the Arctic landscape and its inhabitants.

Photographs by Joseph Loder Bryce. Caption of lower left photo reads, "Aerial view of the Edito, note the paths we made by circling about in the ice. Sondrestrom, Greenland. 5/18/54."

Photographs by Joseph Loder Bryce. Caption of lower left photo reads, “Aerial view of the Edisto, note the paths we made by circling about in the ice. Sondrestrom, Greenland. 5/18/54.”

I grew up with boxes of these photographs in my life; they were a perennial choice for “show and tell” in grammar school and I loved to share the exotic icebergs, people, polar bears, and frozen ships with my friends.

The images, shapes, places and people I “knew” but never met became a visual foundation for me. I now know I was influenced by my father’s eye for composition, shapes, and light as well as his interest in telling stories that come from landscape. These attributes have become the very context of my nearly 40 years of art-making.

"On my easel: ice formation off Greenland with kayaker, working from my Dad's photos." July 26, 2017

“On my easel: ice formation off Greenland with kayaker, working from my Dad’s photos.” July 26, 2017

After Loder’s death, I found myself engaging with his photos yet again and was struck and inspired by the old familiar shapes and simple colorless format. No longer able to hear my father’s stories about the pictures, I started a new conversation with my paintbrush. I began with no plan in mind as I painted one iceberg, then some polar bears, and then a ship…one by one the photos found their way into my studio. Working on these paintings was a form of meditation for me.

Detail of painting "Exodus"

Detail of painting “Exodus”

My first paintings were in oil on a vivid red ground I typically use when painting en plein air. The vibration of the limited, cool palette against the red quickly appealed to me; I connected with the raw edges of color as I worked, excited by how the colors created an emotional response and competing feeling of calm and urgency. I also chose to work in encaustic wax because of the rich texture and intimate scale made possible in that medium.

Photograph by Joseph Loder Bryce (left) and detail of encaustic painting "Ice Journey" by Phyllis Bryce Ely.

Photograph by Joseph Loder Bryce (left) and detail of encaustic painting “Ice Journey” by Phyllis Bryce Ely.

As I finished each painting I tucked the work away with no particular plan for sharing them,  but knew I wanted them to be together. On New Year’s Eve, I set a goal of pulling the photographs and paintings together for a show, which ultimately led to this exhibit.

"Not My Father's Iceberg" exhibition at Main Street Arts

“Not My Father’s Iceberg” exhibition at Main Street Arts

"Not My Father's Iceberg" exhibition at Main Street Arts

“Not My Father’s Iceberg” exhibition at Main Street Arts

I am grateful to gallery director Brad Butler for his early interest in these paintings, which he first saw when my first iceberg painting was juried into the Utopia/Dystopia exhibit at Main Street Arts in 2017 and was awarded “Best in Show.”

Phyllis Bryce Ely with her painting from "Utopia/Dystopia" (left); Joseph Loder Bryce (1930–2015) at an exhibition of his photographs in 2014

Phyllis Bryce Ely with her painting from “Utopia/Dystopia” (left); Joseph Loder Bryce (1930–2015) at an exhibition of his photographs in 2014

Please enjoy my contemporary consideration of a decades-old Arctic landscape that once was my father’s place in the world. 


Not My Father’s Iceberg, a solo exhibition on the second floor at Main Street Arts, presents paintings by Phyllis Bryce Ely made in response to photographs taken by her father, Joseph Loder Bryce. The exhibition runs August 3 through September 15, 2018 and can be viewed on the gallery’s Artsy page.

 

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Karen Tretiak

Jewelry designer Karen Tretiak is one of eight artists in our current exhibition, “Multifaceted: An Exhibition of Fine Jewelry”. We asked her a few questions about her background and the work that can be found in the exhibition.

Karen Tretiak

Karen Tretiak

Q: What influences you? What themes or symbols appear throughout your work?
A: My jewelry exemplifies the visual excitement I find in layering textures, colors, values and materials. I gather imagery and inspiration from the natural world around me; in particular the sea and forest. Moss greens, autumn coppers, silken leaves, woven shadows, luminescent waves, and polished stones appear and reappear throughout my work.

Green Soutache Necklace

Green Soutache Necklace

River Jasper Cabochon Necklace

River Jasper Cabochon Necklace

Q: Tell us a little bit about your background. How long have you been making art?
A: Creativity has guided my life from as far back as I can remember. Mud, paint, crayons, yarn…so many possibilities as a child. As is true of most artists, that child-like joy has never left me but has been guided and nurtured through skill development and life-long learning.

Traveling!

Traveling!

I am an artist and a teacher; each influencing the other. Professionally I have taught in a wide variety of venues from public high school to colleges to workshops and lectures. My paintings, jewelry and ceramic sculptures have been displayed and marketed throughout the world. I have earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Art Education from Skidmore College and a Master of Fine Arts from Rochester Institute of Technology.

Roxie helping to take pictures

Roxie helping to take pictures

Q: Where else can we see your work?
A: I live and work in the Finger Lakes area of Western New York State as well as in “Maxine the Wonder Bus” when I’m on the road. I market my work at many venues across the country which gives me the opportunity to travel and meet many of my customers.

Maxine The Wonder Bus in Maine

“Maxine The Wonder Bus” in Maine

See more of my work on my website: www.karentretiak.com and my Etsy page WonderBusCreations. 


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Karen’s work in our current exhibition “Multifaceted: An Exhibition of Fine Jewelry” through August 18, 2017. Karen’s work from the exhibition is also available for purchase in our online gallery shop: store.mainstreetartsgallery.com

Ontario Pathways Photo Exhibition

The Ontario Pathways Photo Exhibition is a collaborative effort between Main Street Arts, Clifton Springs Hospital Auxiliary, and Ontario Pathways. The goal is three-fold: (1) Make people more active and healthy by hiking local trails; (2) Encourage people to connect with their local environment; (3) Give photo-enthusiasts of all levels and abilities the opportunity to exhibit their photographs in a contemporary art gallery.

To Submit Your Photos:

  1. Send up to three .jpeg images (no larger than 2MB each) taken on the Ontario Pathways to mstreetarts@gmail.com. All submissions must be taken on or near the trail.
  2. Be sure the subject line says the following:  “Your Name — Ontario Pathways Exhibit”.
  3. Include the following in the body of your email:
  • Your Name
  • Address
  • Phone number
  • Title of the photograph
  • Location where you took the photograph
  • Printed size if selected for the exhibition

Submission Deadline: May 25, 2015
Exhibition Dates: July 9–31, 2015
Opening Reception: Thursday, July 16, 4–7 p.m.

More information: Ontario Pathways Submissions

You’re invited to join Ontario Pathways in their Hiking Series Planned for 2015! This is a great opportunity to take photographs for this exhibition. The following information is taken directly from their flyer:

Hike Plan

Starting in Canandaigua and heading to Stanley, then from Stanley to Phelps. Meet at the designated locations by 9:30.

April 25th: Meet at the New Covenant Baptist Church parking lot on County Road 46.
We will car pool back to Main Street Canandaigua. The  hike will go from Main Street to County Road 46. Distance of three miles.

May 9th: Meet at the New Covenant Baptist Church parking lot on County Road 46.
Hike will go to Depot Road. Hiking distance of five miles.

Hike Plan

Starting in Phelps and heading to Stanley, then from Stanley to Canandaigua. Meet at the designated locations by 10:00.

May 12th: Meet at the Gifford Road Trail Head.
This is a hike from the trailhead to the county line and back out. 3.6 miles round trip hike. Take Rt. 88 north of Phelps. Turn onto Rockefeller Road, then left on Wilber Road, then right on Gifford Road. Trail Head is 1000 feet ahead on the left.

May 19th: Meet at the Rt. 96 Trailhead/parking lot.
Four mile hike. The Rt. 96 Trailhead is a quarter mile east of State Rt. 488 on State Rt. 96.

Running late? Missed the car pool? Then go directly to the starting point or the first available road crossing that allows parking. We will get you back to your car at the end of the hike.

Go to our website www.ontariopathways.org click on CONTACT and let us know you are coming. We will send out a reminder for each hike.

Upstate New York Ceramics Invitational

The Upstate New York Ceramics Invitational at Main Street Arts will feature functional and sculptural ceramic work by 13 artists from the region. This invitational represents some of the most exciting contemporary ceramic work being made in upstate New York.

The exhibition will be held July 11–August 29, 2015.
Online purchasing will begin in mid-July.

Bryan Hopkins
Buffalo, NY
www.hopkinspottery.com

Buffalo ceramic artist Bryan Hopkins

Bryan Hopkins

Artwork by Buffalo ceramic artist Bryan Hopkins

New Work by Bryan Hopkins

 

Michael Hughes
Syracuse, NY
www.mrhstudio.com

Syracuse ceramic artist Michael Hughes

Michael Hughes

Artwork by Syracuse ceramic artist Michael Hughes

Porcelain and Stoneware Bowls by Michael Hughes

 

Bethany Krull
Buffalo, NY
www.bethanykrull.com

Buffalo ceramic artist Bethany Krull

Buffalo ceramic artist Bethany Krull

Artwork by Buffalo ceramic artist Bethany Krull

Four Hungry Birds by Bethany Krull

 

Ashley Lyon
Hornell, NY
www.ashleylyon.com

Hornell ceramic artist Ashley Lyon

Ashley Lyon

Artwork by Hornell ceramic arist Ashley Lyon

Bent Leg by Ashley Lyon

 

Colleen McCall
Elmira, NY
www.colleenmccallceramics.com

Elmira ceramic artist Colleen McCall

Colleen McCall

Artwork by Elmira ceramic artist Colleen McCall

Golden Basin Bowl by Colleen McCall

 

Peter Pincus
Rochester, NY
www.peterpincus.com

Penfield ceramic artist Peter Pincus

Peter Pincus

Artwork by Penfield ceramic artist Peter Pincus

Vases by Peter Pincus

 

Joanna Poag
Rochester, NY
www.joannapoag.com

Rochester ceramic artist Joanna Poag

Joanna Poag

Artwork by Rochester ceramic artist Joanna Poag

Flourish by Joanna Poag

 

Jeremy Randall
Tully, NY
www.jeremyrandallceramics.com

Tully ceramic artist Jeremy Randall

Jeremy Randall

Artwork by Tully ceramic artist Jeremy Randall

Mugs by Jeremy Randall

 

Jody Selin
Buffalo, NY
www.jodyselin.com

Buffalo ceramic artist Jody Selin

Jody Selin

Buffalo ceramic artist Jody Selin

Sculpture by Jody Selin

Kala Stein
Canadice, NY
www.kalastein.com

Canadice ceramic artist Kala Stein

Kala Stein

Artwork by Alfred ceramic artist Kala Stein

Umbra by Kala Stein

 

Kate Symonds
Canandaigua, NY
www.coachstreetclay.com

Canandaigua ceramic artist Kate Symonds

Kate Symonds

Artwork by Canandaigua ceramic artist Kate Symonds

Teapot by Kate Symonds

 

Hannah Thompsett
Alfred, NY
www.hannahthompsett.com

Alfred ceramic artist Hannah Thompsett

Hannah Thompsett

Artwork by Alfred ceramic artist Hannah Thompsett

 New Work by Hannah Thompsett

 

Virginia Torrence
Alfred, NY
www.virginiatorrence.com

Alfred ceramic artist Virginia Torrence

Virginia Torrence

Artwork by Alfred ceramic artist Virginia Torrence

Sculpture by Virginia Torrence

Stay tuned for more information on the Upstate New York Ceramics Invitational. Check our Facebook page or website for more updates.

Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition 2015

A round of applause to the students who participated in our 2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition, and to our competition winners! Participating students received a 5″ x 7″ canvas and used it to make artwork that fit the theme, “This is What Adventure Looks Like!” The competition features artwork by students grades 6–12 from thirteen area school districts.

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts, open house

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts, open house

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts

Check out the photo album on Flickr to see more images from the exhibition.

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts

2015 Finger Lakes Regional Student Painting Competition at Main Street Arts

The students in this competition are the artists of tomorrow! We had a great time seeing the creativity and innovation coming out of local Finger Lakes schools.

Best in Show:

  • 1st Place: “The Adventures of Galaxy Whale and Cat” by Alexandra F, Fairport High School
  • 2nd Place: “The Voyage” by Carter L, Victor Jr. High School
  • 3rd Place: “Serapis” by Taylor D, Fairport High School

Best in Grade-Level:

  • 6th Grade: “Under The Sea” by Semma A, Victor Intermediate School
  • 7th Grade: “Untitled” by Dedra A, Marion Middle/High School
  • 8th Grade: “A Walk to Adventure” by Hanna G, Victor Intermediate School
  • 9th Grade: “Reconnaissance of Dreams” by Jaelyn M, Marion Middle/High School
  • 10th Grade: “Star Gazing” by Taylor J, North Rose Wolcott High School
  • 11th Grade: “Gravity” by Emily W, Lima Christian School
  • 12th Grade: “Hummed Low” by Alisha B, Penn Yan Academy

The Assembled Image

Get ready for our upcoming exhibition, The Assembled Image. The Assembled Image is an exhibition featuring collage and artwork inspired by collage. The artists included in this exhibition make artwork by assembling various individual pieces to make a cohesive whole, and each artist has their own connection to the notion of collage.

The Assembled Image at Main Street Arts

The Assembled Image at Main Street Arts. Left to right: Denton Crawford, St. Monci, Andrea Pawarski, Lynne Feldman, and Gerald Mead

Artists include: Denton Crawford, Lynne Feldman, Gerald Mead, Andrea Pawarski, and St. Monci.

Exhibition Dates: March 7–April 30, 2015
Opening Reception: Saturday, March 7, 4-7pm

For more information, check out our Facebook event page: The Assembled Image Opening Reception

Solid Gold

Thank you to everyone who made it to the Solid Gold opening reception! It was a great night viewing golden artwork. We appreciate everyone who came out to support the gallery and our artists.

Solid Gold visitors standing by a work of art by Brian O'Neill

Solid Gold visitors next to a work of art by Brian O’Neill

Solid Gold is an exhibition of shining, glimmering, and glowing works in a variety of media by invited artists who use gold leaf, gold lustre, or gold paint. This exhibit includes paintings, mixed media pieces, ceramics, and sculpture.

Gallery visitors view a series of bird paintings on gold leafed panels by Melissa Huang.

Gallery visitors view a series of bird paintings on gold leafed panels by Melissa Huang.

A series of beautiful cups with gold trim by ceramic artist Katie Carey.

A series of beautiful cups with gold trim by ceramic artist Katie Carey.

Artists include:
Katie Carey, Jeanne Raffer-Beck, Melissa Huang, Mitch Messina, Brian O’Neill, Peter Pincus, John Ruggles, Bill Wolff, and Amy Vena.

Artist Amy Vena discusses her artwork with a gallery visitor.

Artist Amy Vena discusses her artwork with a gallery visitor.

Artist John Ruggles wears gold shades in front of his mixed media gold leafed painting.

Artist John Ruggles wears gold leafed shades in front of his mixed media gold leafed painting.

Stop by before February 28, 2015 to see Solid Gold in person! To see more images of the show, check out our Solid Gold album on Flickr, or see video of the show on Vimeo.

Exhibition Dates: January 10–February 28, 2015