Tag Archives: Collage

Meet the Artist in Residence: Emily Long

Emily Long is one of our current artists in residence at Main Street Arts. During the month of August, 2017, she will be exploring new mediums and working on a series that explores the idea that everything is fluid and connected—finding commonalities and relationships between ourselves and our surrounding that inevitably confirm our greater humanity. We asked Emily a few questions about her artwork and studio practice. 

Emily Long

Emily Long

Q: Tell us a little bit about your background.
I was born and raised in Staten Island, New York. At an early age I was enrolled in multiple art programs at my local cultural center, Snug Harbor and was constantly creating things at home thanks to the support of my parents. I was fortunate enough to be accepted into an art focused high school in New York City and continued my interest in visual arts and museum studies in undergrad at Fashion Institute of Technology. Beyond creating my own art, I am passionate about art education and currently work for the New York Historical Society (NYHS) and Smithsonian Cooper Hewitt Design Museum.

Q: How would you describe your work?
My art is fluid. I am interested in exploring the relationship between one’s self and their surroundings. A majority of these works are illustrated with watercolor but I am always excited to add a new medium into my work.

Work by Emily Long, water color and ink

“Raw Synergy Recognize Symmetry”, Emily Long

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
For every piece my process is a little different depending on how much time I am able to give myself to create. Some days I will jump right into a watercolor illustration. Other days I will spend hours researching symbols and their significance; taking notes on how they can be added into a work.

Q: What is the most useful tool in your studio?
My primary medium is watercolor, naturally my paintbrushes are my most used and useful tool in my studio.

Emily working in her studio at Main Street Arts

Emily working in her studio at Main Street Arts

Q: Who is your favorite artist and why?
Choosing a favorite artist feels like telling one’s children who the favorite is. With that said, I love Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh for her fearless use of multiple mediums and line use, Gustav Klimt for his use of gold, and Georgia O’Keeffe for her composition and abstraction. My favorite local artist was my childhood neighbor, Andrea Phillips.

Q: What advice would you give other artists?
Just keep working. Don’t be afraid to “waste” your materials or become upset if you create something you do not like. You have to get the “bad” art out before the masterpiece.

EmilyLong_2Pieces

Work by Emily Long: NY Time Dime (left), and Majority Too Big to Ignore (right)

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
I have had a recent interest in working with gesso and printmaking. I am excited to experiment with new mediums and making my work more sculptural while at Main Street Arts Residency. Recent projects have been inspired by folklore and myths. I plan to explore these themes with the exploration of new mediums.  

Q: What’s next for you?
In the fall, I will return to work at the museum. As for my art, I will be turning an old office space into my studio, where I hope to spend most of my free time.

Q: Where else can we find you?
On my website: emilysarahlong.com and on Instagram.


Emily is teaching a crocheted cacti gardens amigurumi workshop on Saturday, August 12 from 12 to 3 p.m. at Main Street Arts. Amigurumi is the Japanese art of crocheting small stuffed creatures/objects. Sign up on our website to reserve your spot!

Meet the Artist in Residence: Kira Buckel

Kira Buckel is an artist in residence at Main Street Arts. She’s working in one of our two studio spaces during the months of November–December 2016 (you can stop by the gallery to see her studio and works in progress). We asked Kira a few questions about her artwork, life, and more:

Kira Buckel working in her studio at Main Street Arts

Kira Buckel working in her studio at Main Street Arts

Q: To start this off, would you tell us about your background?

A: I grew up on the East End of Long Island and always enjoyed drawing as a child. I studied art in high school and through college. I graduated from Bard College with a BA in Studio Art this past May. As a recent graduate I’ve been working and living back home and looking for job opportunities in art.

Kira Buckel, "Infinite Kitchen" (detail), acrylic, gouache, painted collaged paper, PVA glue, tape on paper, 22’ x 7’, 2016.

Kira Buckel, “Infinite Kitchen” (detail), acrylic, gouache, painted collaged paper, PVA glue, tape on paper, 22’ x 7’, 2016.

Q: How would you describe your work? 

A: I usually work in a 2-D format, mostly painting and drawing, and occasionally printmaking. At college I explored sculpture as well, but settled back into painting for my senior thesis. Most recently I have been working with collaged paper that I paint or using found papers and incorporating them into paintings. I like to work representationally, usually of everyday reality, but mixed with the imagined in order to express a personal relationship to the subject of the painting.

Kira Buckel works on a new painting/collage

Kira Buckel works on a new painting/collage

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?

A: I work from sketches and photos, but ultimately allow the materials I’m using to direct the process of painting. When working with collaged paper I sometimes peel off layers or use sandpaper to reveal what is underneath. I enjoy working this way because it is tactile and almost sculptural.

Kira creates her works by collaging painted paper

Kira creates her works by collaging painted paper

Kira Buckel, "On an Anxious Sea" (detail), acrylic, watercolor, painted collaged paper, PVA glue, tape on paper, 12’ x 6’4”, 2016.

Kira Buckel, “On an Anxious Sea” (detail), acrylic, watercolor, painted collaged paper, PVA glue, tape on paper, 12’ x 6’4”, 2016.

Q: Who is your favorite artist and why?

A: One of my favorite artists is Pierre Bonnard. I’m always inspired by how he transformed everyday scenes into otherworldly images through his paintings. His use of color is especially magical.

Q: What are your goals for this residency? Tell us about your current projects.

A: I want to make as many paintings as I can during my time here, using sketches and imagery from the past. I’d like to explore the Finger Lakes region and paint local scenes as well.

kira6

Q: What’s next for you?

A: Next I’ll be attending a residency at the Vermont Studio Center for the month of February. After that, I’m applying for other residencies and opportunities, and continuing the search for jobs in NYC or the northeast in general. Eventually I’d like to attend graduate school.

kira7

Q: Where else can we find you?

You can view my work at www.kirabuckel.com. I’ll also be on Instagram soon!


Are you an artist looking for new opportunities? Apply for a residency at Main Street Arts! Artists in residence will have 24-hour access to a large studio on our second floor (with great natural light), the option to show work in the gallery, and the opportunity to teach paid workshops. Housing is available. Submissions are reviewed and residencies awarded quarterly.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Heather Swenson: The Link Between Silkscreen and Collage

A little over four years ago I moved back to Rochester after graduating from Purchase College of Art and Design with a BFA in Interdisciplinary Visual Arts and a concentration in Painting and Printmaking. Since then I have continued to work across several mediums, moving between silkscreen, collage, painting, sculpture and installation. Currently I have been focusing on silkscreen and collage, noticing their similarities and working to integrate principles of collage into my prints.

My screenprints always start from a drawing, often one that I cut up and rearrange. This drawing often goes through many stages before I settle on a composition for the final print. Through the images below I will walk through the process of making one of my recent screenprints, Temporary Stability.

One of the first compositions for Temporary Stability.

One of the first compositions for Temporary Stability.

Final drawing for Temporary Stability.

Final drawing for Temporary Stability.

I sort through an ever-growing collection of old books and paper for inspiration, often adding new elements into the drawing.

Paper scraps from my collection.

Paper scraps from my collection

Once I arrive at the finished drawing I start making layers for the print. I lay a sheet of acetate over the drawing and trace a section with a lightfast marker.  With silkscreen, each color is laid down separately, so for every color in the print there will be a corresponding sheet of acetate. This process of separating colors and focusing on how parts make up the whole link up to the way I think about collage.

Making the layers for the print, this film will be used when exposing the screen.

Making the layers for the print, this film will be used when exposing the screen.

In my studio in the Hungerford Building, I have a small exposure unit that I built to expose the screens and a table with hinge clamps to make my prints.

My silkscreen table  with a screen in the hinge clamps.

My silkscreen table in my studio with a screen in the hinge clamps.

Aside from the loose palette I select for the silkscreen, printing is a spontaneous process for me.  I mix my colors as I work, often making changes along the way.  As shown below the final print, Temporary Stability, is slightly different from the final drawing I made. Instead of the grey shape at the bottom, I printed a scanned security envelope pattern.

The final preparatory drawing and the final print.

The final preparatory drawing and the final print.

Among other prints and a set of small sculptures, I have two pieces in the Upstate NY Printmaking Invitational that bridge the gap between collage and silkscreen. They are collages that I made from cutting up my screenprints. Repurposing of my work in silkscreen brings it full circle to the beginning stages of the process when I am arranging parts for the drawing.

Collage made entirely from cut up screenprints.

Collage made entirely from cut up screenprints.


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Heather Swenson’s prints in our current exhibition the Upstate New York Printmaking Invitational (runs through October 7). You can see more of Heather’s work online at www.heatherswenson.com or follow her on Instagram @heatherswensonart.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by printmaker Gregory Page.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Ellie Honl: Part I

_MG_7924My name is Ellie Honl and I am currently an art professor at Indiana University in Bloomington, IN. I am originally from Stevens Point, a city of about 35,000 in Central Wisconsin. My mother is an art teacher so I was very fortunate to have early exposure to the arts. I had an endless supply of art materials, and my mom took my younger brother and I to a lot of art museums growing up. We lived in an area where there weren’t many other children, so my brother and I spent a lot of time entertaining ourselves by building forts in the forest behind our house, Lego cities, and elaborate canal systems in our sandbox. I also taught myself things like calligraphy and needlepoint. This history of exploration and independence contributes to my art making today.

 

I thought about being an artist as a child, but in high school I loved math and science, and planned to become a psychiatrist or architect. It wasn’t until my junior year at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota that I finally decided to pursue studio art. Even though I liked a lot of different subjects, art was the one that fulfilled me the most and satisfied my need to create. The subject of psychology and architectural elements play a major role in my artwork today.

I pursued printmaking at the University of Iowa and received my MFA in 2008. Since then, I have taught art at a number of Universities and art centers across the country while continuing to make my own artwork.

This is me screenprinting in the printshop at Indiana University.

This is me screenprinting in the classroom at Indiana University.

My artwork utilizes printmaking techniques along with photographic and time-based media. I’ve currently been making screenprints and cyanotypes that I incorporate together by sewing, and I often paint and add other collaged elements to them. I also make stop-motion animations with these prints and/or parts of these prints.

"Assemble," cyanotype, screenprint, sewing, collage, 2013

“Assemble,” cyanotype, screenprint, sewing, collage, 2013

"Take Root" (detail), cyanotype, screenprint, sewing, 2013

“Take Root” (detail), cyanotype, screenprint, sewing, 2013

I am inspired by the wonders I observe around me (often in nature) but the outcome of my artwork is usually about the human condition: how we cope, how we perceive, and how we are affected by our past. It is about the human desire to find stability. Through my artwork, I try to understand why things are the way they are and strive to find logic in the random. I work intuitively allowing myself to experiment with unpredictable processes to discover new marks and imagery. Many times these initial investigations look chaotic and they provide a problem for me to resolve. I impose order through geometric forms and color, while making connections through lines, written explanations, and collage elements. My work is often detailed and visually appealing, and I hope that it draws people in and causes them to enjoy the process of looking.

"Becoming," cyanotype, gouache, colored pencil,   2014

“Becoming,” cyanotype, gouache, colored pencil, 24″x30″ 2014

"Westminster Ct.: Appearances Can be Deceiving," silkscreen and colored pencil on layers of frosted mylar, 20"x30" 2014

“Westminster Ct.: Appearances Can be Deceiving,” silkscreen and colored pencil on layers of frosted mylar, 20″x30″ 2014

Check back later in the week to read about Ellie’s creative process in Inside the Artist’s Studio with Ellie Honl: Part II.

You can see more of Ellie’s artwork on her website at www.elliehonl.com. Stop by to see three of her pieces (including one honorable mention!) in our current juried exhibition, Structurally Speaking.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by architectural painter Susan Stuart.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Denton Crawford

Most of my family is from the Southeastern U.S. My father was in the military so we moved around a lot when I was a kid. By the time I was 18 I’d spent half my life over seas. I received my BFA from the University of South Florida in 2007, and my MFA from the University of Georgia in 2011. I currently teach drawing and new media classes at RIT, in Rochester, NY.

mixed media collage on mounted paper

End of the Road mixed media collage on mounted paper

I got into drawing in my early teens, which was more of a hobby up until I started school. I was an english major before I switched to the visual arts, and I still have a real affinity for narrative art and story telling. I think of my own work as snapshots from a larger personal narrative. I got my BFA at the University of South Florida, where I stuck mostly to painting that incorporated my surroundings in terms of color palette and subject matter. I wanted to create portraits that evoked empathy, humility and humor. Painting has always been about materiality, surface and color for me. When I went to graduate school I wanted to make big changes to the way I worked. I started painting larger, more abstractly and on various surfaces, incorporating the space around and in front of the paintings, using sculpture and the wall itself. This led to a series of works that engaged a larger space and allowed me to explore my ideas in other ways, and with different materials, where drawing also started to play a big roll. 

Our Church acrylic, gouache and spray paint on pvc

Our Church
acrylic, gouache and spray paint on pvc

Most of the work is driven by conflicting ideologies about various subjects – religion, utopian ideals, the loss of innocence, and metaphysical experience.  A good majority of the source imagery comes from personal adventures, travels, places I’ve lived or visited. It’s a kind of personal narrative played out through my interaction with the landscape and a sense of place. I also like to incorporate what might be considered trite or cliche imagery, like skulls. Attempting to elevate or reinvest something with new or different meaning is always interesting. I like to think of these as moments from a utopian downfall, a perfection not quite attainable, enticing the viewer with color and tactile surface.

Daydreams acrylic, gouache and spray paint on panel

Daydreams
acrylic, gouache and spray paint on panel

I like to keep things playful and responsive in the studio. I’ll usually start with a general idea or plan of attack, often referencing previous works and incorporating things from them that I really like or find successful. I get a lot of ideas while I’m working, so I keep a sketchbook of notes and drawings handy to reference and jot things down. Paintings often start with drawings from the sketchbook or personal photos. I get all of my best ideas from reading, whether fiction or philosophy, novels or poems. Daydreams is based on some of the themes and iconography from Lord of the Flies, which I had only recently read for the first time. It’s so fantastic as an analysis of human nature, a lot of those themes were already present in my work. As form materials and process, I use a lot of tape, stencils, and mediums, there’s a lot of masking and layering.

studio shot 1

For a recent solo show at Joy Gallery in Rochester, NY titled You’re Not Here, I chose to focus more on sculpture and installation. I am always thinking about objects and space in relation to the drawings, paintings and collages that I make, as well as the ideas that inform them. It’s an attempt to create a memorable experience for the viewer, I want to give them a moment that they will not forget. For this exhibition I took the opportunity to make a small installation titled My Disembodied Sermon in room at the back of the gallery.

install shot disembodied 2

This allowed me to incorporate a lot of the things I had been thinking about doing for some time – using a playful approach to material, aesthetic and conceptual concerns, and thinking about religious iconography and experience in relation to objects, space, and what one might consider religious experience. It’s a sort of reliquary.

skull detail

I spent a lot of time in the studio working with a variety of materials including insulation foam, cast foam and plastic, fabricated and found objects, and thinking of ways to combine painting, installation and these 3D forms. I really enjoy working this way and bringing these materials together.

cross home

cross 6

cross 7

neon 2

For more information on Denton Crawford you can visit his website at www.dentoncrawford.com. Feel free to contact the artist via the email on his site. Or stop by the gallery to see his work in our current exhibition, The Assembled Image.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by fabric collage artist Lynne Feldman.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Lynne Feldman

I have been making art my whole life.  One of my earliest memories is of going with my parents to Atlantic City, where someone gave me a piece of hard candy in a beautiful foil wrapper.  I saved the wrapper, brought it home, pasted it down and drew a head arms and legs on it.  I made my first collage at three years old.

Lynne Feldman

Lynne Feldman

Lynne Feldman, Lighting the Candles, acrylic paint and fabric on canvas,  36" x 40"

Lynne Feldman, Lighting the Candles, acrylic paint and fabric on canvas, 36″ x 40″

My parents were both artists. My dad was a writer for TV and my mother had been a singer prior to marriage, with an operatic voice.  My creativity was always encouraged and my art classes began at age four.  I grew up on the Upper West Side of Manhattan so I had access to museums and good art schools.  There were young children’s classes at the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum in those days.

I received my first set of oil paints at around eight years old. It was a  paint by number set, but my parents did not allow me to use the image with the numbers on the front of the canvas board, I had to use the back (this was fine with me).   I fell in love with oils then.  When I was twelve, I began more serious art training at The Art Students League on West 57th street.   I drew and painted  there from the model  for fifteen years: life drawing classes in charcoal and painting in oils.

Lynne Feldman at work

Lynne Feldman at work

I painted in oils for forty years, and then took a week long summer workshop at Bennington College in Vermont.  That class changed my life. The title of the class was painting with fabric. I was introduced to the concept of gluing fabrics directly onto the canvas.  Because the glue was water based, I had to learn to paint in acrylics.  I had always integrated patterns and design into my paintings so it seemed such a natural transition to actually use fabrics with pattern directly on my paintings.

Fabrics

Fabrics

Many different types of fabrics

Many different types of fabrics

It was hard to put my oils away after all that time but I was developing some respiratory issues and basically needed an excuse to find a different medium to work in.   This was perfect.  I absolutely fell in love with it.  I stretch a canvas, plan a composition in charcoal, do a rough painting in acrylics, and then begin the gluing and painting process on top. My collage/paintings can take from a month to a year to complete.  I love every minute of the process.

ABruno_2013-11-08_Lynne02

Lynne Feldman, "At the Waterfall", acrylic paint and fabric on canvas, 36" x 40"

Lynne Feldman, “At the Waterfall”, acrylic paint and fabric on canvas, 36″ x 40″

For more information on Lynne Feldman you can visit her website at http://lynnefeldman.com. Or stop by the gallery to see her work in our current exhibition, The Assembled Image.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by jewelry artist Heather Bivens of Weathered Heather.

The Assembled Image

Get ready for our upcoming exhibition, The Assembled Image. The Assembled Image is an exhibition featuring collage and artwork inspired by collage. The artists included in this exhibition make artwork by assembling various individual pieces to make a cohesive whole, and each artist has their own connection to the notion of collage.

The Assembled Image at Main Street Arts

The Assembled Image at Main Street Arts. Left to right: Denton Crawford, St. Monci, Andrea Pawarski, Lynne Feldman, and Gerald Mead

Artists include: Denton Crawford, Lynne Feldman, Gerald Mead, Andrea Pawarski, and St. Monci.

Exhibition Dates: March 7–April 30, 2015
Opening Reception: Saturday, March 7, 4-7pm

For more information, check out our Facebook event page: The Assembled Image Opening Reception

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Jeanne Beck: Coming Home Through Creating

www.jeannebeck.com

Jeanne Beck at work in her studio in Rochester, NY’s Hungerford Building

It seems to me my whole life has been a slow, steady evolution of coming home to myself. I suspect a lot of women of my generation feel that way. My earlier life didn’t offer a lot of stimulation or opportunity to study music or dance or art, all of which interested me greatly, but I did read voraciously. I fantasized about writing novels and started writing short stories at age 12, but then I became absorbed in teen-age concerns. I turned to keeping a journal, which I wrote in faithfully from 7-12th grade. I’ve done personal journaling in some form for most of my life and have a storage box filled with composition notebooks and more recently, sketchbooks too.

Book of the Ancients 6, 18" x 18", mixed media collage, gold leaf, acrylic paint. Cut, collaged, screen-printed and stenciled.

Book of the Ancients 6, 18″ x 18″, mixed media collage, gold leaf, acrylic paint. Cut, collaged, screen-printed and stenciled.

When I decided at mid-life to become a visual artist, I made a total commitment to it. Lose, win or draw, I have invested myself fully in my own creative potential. And, as a result, this midlife adventure has become the most passionate, committed period of my life. Since I began exploring visual art, I have been drawn to combine more than one medium or techniques, as well as create multi-layered surfaces.

The Writing in Air pieces utilize a variety of processes and techniques to create a dimensional , cut and manipulated surface that suggests  cursive handwriting. Purchased by SUNY Geneseo for MacVittie Student Union.

The Writing in Air pieces utilize a variety of processes and techniques to create a dimensional , cut and manipulated surface that suggests cursive handwriting. Purchased by SUNY Geneseo for MacVittie Student Union.

Melding media and techniques to express a concept drives most of my choices. So I might stitch thread structures and dip them in paper pulp, for example. Layering and combining materials and methods is a fluid process and varies with each new idea. I like to envision my pieces accumulating layers over time and bearing the marks of use and age to build their own personal history.

Distressing the leafed surface with layers of acrylic paints and screen printed texts creates a patina of aging. Private collection, Boston, MA.

Distressing the leafed surface with layers of acrylic paints and screen printed texts creates a patina of aging. Private collection, Boston, MA.

Seemingly random numbers cut in fiberglass screening punctuate the aged surface of this piece. They are a list of street numbers from the houses where I've lived over the course of my life. They are as I remember them, but I have no idea whether the memories are accurate. Purchased by SUNY Geneseo for MacVittie Student Union.

Seemingly random numbers cut in fiberglass screening punctuate the aged surface of this piece. They are a list of street numbers from the houses where I’ve lived over the course of my life. They are as I remember them, but I have no idea whether the memories are accurate. Purchased by SUNY Geneseo for MacVittie Student Union.

I am drawn to aged surfaces and tend to try to and create them in whatever medium or technique I’m using. Rust, decay, and layers peeling away attract me. They also relate to my interests in memory and aging and what happens to personal histories over time.

Most of the scattered  images on this piece refer to The Palmer Method of Cursive Handwriting instruction. Once  a part of elementary school curriculum, cursive handwriting  has become almost obsolete.

Most of the scattered images on this piece refer to The Palmer Method of Cursive Handwriting instruction. Once a part of elementary school curriculum, cursive handwriting has become almost obsolete.

The earliest concept for my current series of language-inspired pieces started in 2007. I had done extensive research on Etruscan and other forms of ancient writing remnants and the marks  intrigued me as visual elements. Then my focus shifted to an interest in 19th and 20th century found journals, diaries and bits of cursive writing.

This work lists all the names of the teachers I can remember from my elementary school in Pittsburgh, PA. Book of the Ancients 9: Bethel Park Elementary, won a prestigious 2013 Niche Award.

This work lists all the names of the teachers I can remember from my elementary school in Pittsburgh, PA. Book of the Ancients 9: Bethel Park Elementary, won a prestigious 2013 Niche Award.

Green World IIMy metallic leaf series began in 2011 with the idea of “fluttering pages.” The exploration of ancient texts and languages to gather ideas for this series led me to an unexpected realization, “ancient” is a relative term. To someone entering adulthood today, the 1950’s and 60’s seem ancient. Amused by that recognition, the first works in this series focus on remembered bits from my childhood. We often refer to ‘turning a page’, ‘ getting on the same page’, ‘starting a new or closing an old chapter of our lives’ in our everyday conversations. These pieces offer a visual take on such ideas.

Green World II is a new organically-inspired, dimensional  work with layered kozo fibers over a  richly textured, painted surface.

Green World II is a new organically-inspired, dimensional work with layered kozo fibers over a richly textured, painted surface.

The pages series still doesn’t feel finished and I will continue to work on new ideas. However, I am also working on a new series of organic, two and three-dimensional works using handmade paper, pulp and wire armatures.

You can see more of Jeanne’s work in our current exhibition, Solid Gold, or visit her website: www.jeannebeck.com.

Check out our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by artist Colleen Pendry.

“Metaphysical Musings” – Paintings, Drawings, & Collage by Lacey McKinney & Shannon Crandall

One of our current exhibitions Upstairs at Main Street Arts, Metaphysical Musings is a two-person show featuring paintings, drawings, and collage by Lacey McKinney and Shannon Crandall.

Lacey McKinney, Eviscera, oil on canvas

Lacey McKinney, Eviscera, oil on canvas

Shannon Crandall, Brave Intuition, acrylic & collage on canvas

Shannon Crandall, Brave Intuition, acrylic & collage on canvas

McKinney and Crandall both create works with lush, intricate surfaces. Whether they do so through thick brushstrokes and texture, or through delicate layering of color and paper, their mark-making is truly beautiful.

Metaphysical Musings isn’t just concerned with what’s on the surface, however. These works also focus on what’s just below or above the surface of what we look at. Metaphysics is a branch of philosophy concerned with explaining the fundamental nature of being and the world that encompasses it, these paintings make reference to this
in various ways.

Lacey McKinney, I Am You #7, powdered pigment on paper

Lacey McKinney, I Am You #7, powdered pigment on paper

Come check out the exhibit! Their work looks even more impressive in person. You can see more of Lacey McKinney’s work here and more of Shannon Crandall’s work here.

Exhibition Dates: June 6–July 26, 2014