Tag Archives: Cultivate

Cultivate_exhibition_4

From The Director: Cultivate

I often ask myself the questions “who are we?” and “how are we perceived?”. At this moment in time, I am being especially reflective and thinking about the larger vision of Main Street Arts and how we fit into the cultural context of our region and beyond. I am also thinking of what defines the gallery and our point of view. What gives us continuity year after year?

Installation shot from CULTIVATE; Left to right: work by Jody Selin, Lanna Pejovic, and Pat Bacon

Installation shot from CULTIVATE; Left to right: work by Jody Selin, Lanna Pejovic, and Pat Bacon

Above all else, I believe it is the process of curating. The careful consideration of what happens when two seemingly disparate pieces come together in close proximity in an exhibition. I want to present art in a way that gives a new context or a different understanding — a reexamination of something commonplace or well known. More than showing any one thing specifically, I am interested in the way we look at the world and at the people, places, and things within it. How the artists that we show interpret both the human experience and the world in which we live is integral. I look forward to each year of programming at the gallery with fresh eyes and an appetite to discover something new and interesting with the hope to share that with everyone who visits Main Street Arts.

Installation shot from CULTIVATE, In foreground, work by Chad Grohman

Installation shot from CULTIVATE, In foreground, work by Chad Grohman

CULTIVATE is not only an exhibition of great work by Pat Bacon, Chad Grohman, Patrick Kana, Meredith Mallwitz, Lanna Pejovic, Jody Selin, Mike Tarantelli, and Sylvia Taylor, it is also the start of something new. With this exhibition serving as the kick off event, we are starting to represent the work of these eight gallery artists. Thinking about the launch of our new program at Main Street Arts gets me thinking about where we have been and where we plan to go; as this comes on the cusp of our five year anniversary of opening the gallery in June of 2013.

Left: Our first exhibition,"Locality" in June 2013; Right: "Cultivate" in April 2018.

Left: Our first exhibition,”Locality” in June 2013; Right: “Cultivate” in April 2018.

I have learned many things since starting this journey as a gallery director and curator. Some have been practical and others have been existential but everything has contributed to getting us where we are at the present moment.

We have always made an effort to put together exhibitions that showcase engaging work in a variety of media from across the upstate New York region. As we move forward, we will hone in on this even more by mounting solo exhibitions and small group shows from our new roster of gallery artists. I am extremely excited about being involved with a select number of artists over a long period of time. The depth that we will be able to achieve by showing an evolving body of work from a group of artists presents great possibilities.

Left: Drawing by Tricia Butski, who will be featured in the upcoming "Upstate NY Drawing Invitational" at the end of August; Right: Work by Lin Price and Carrianne Hendrickson from "Dream State", January 2018.

Left: Drawing by Tricia Butski, who will be featured in the upcoming “Upstate NY Drawing Invitational” at the end of August; Right: Work by Lin Price and Carrianne Hendrickson from “Dream State”, January 2018.

In addition to showing the work of our gallery artists, we will of course continue to have the same kind of exhibitions that people have come to know and expect from Main Street Arts. From our national juried shows to the invitational exhibitions that bring together the work of different artists from across the region. Whether the exhibitions are media specific (i.e. our upcoming Upstate New York Drawing Invitational) or centered around some kind of subject or theme (i.e. Sacred Curiosities, Dream State), we will still continue our search for new work by artists we have yet to meet.


The exhibition CULTIVATE will run through Friday,  May 18, 2018. More information about each of the eight gallery artists can be found on our website. View available work on the gallery’s Artsy page.

The finished print with blue, red and grey added by hand.

Inside The Artist’s Studio with Sylvia Taylor

Every spring the spotted salamanders migrate from the woods behind my home in Ithaca, New York.  We watch for them on rainy nights. With a flashlight you can see their little dinosaur bodies moving forward into the night.  My print called The Quickening,  was inspired by the salamander migration.

salamander night

A Little Dinosaur in the Garden

Most of my work is created by a process called relief printmaking. It involves carving a piece of wood or linoleum, rolling ink onto the surface, and then transferring the ink/image onto paper. The final print will be the mirror image of the carved plate.   My favorite part of the process is carving the plate.

But first, I must get the drawing onto the plate.

I often draw directly onto the linoleum plate.

I often draw directly onto the linoleum plate.

Now for the fun part!

Cutting the Lino

Cutting the Lino

More Cutting...

More Cutting…

When you first roll ink onto the plate, it seems to spring to life before your eyes.  I love this part.

The image comes to life and any areas that need to be tweaked show up clearly.

The image comes to life

The plate is inked up and ready to proof

The plate is inked up and ready to proof

Next step is printing. Here’s my press:

My Printing Press

My Printing Press

The Ink from the Lino Plate is Transferred to the Paper...

The Ink from the Lino Plate is Transferred to the Paper…

It typically takes a few days for the ink to dry, depending on the weather

It typically takes a few days for the ink to dry, depending on the weather.

Once they are dry, I can add color and experiment.

Painting spots...

Painting spots…

The final print:

The finished print with blue, red and grey added by hand.

The finished print, “The Quickening”,  with blue, red and grey added by hand.

The word quickening references the idea of something speeding up but it is also a word used in pregnancy for the first moment that a woman feels the baby move in utero. Because I was a midwife for many years, I especially love that double entendre. I frequently see the process of making art with midwife eyes. Birth metaphors always come to mind.

In this print I was interested in exploring a certain kind of psychological undercurrent. Sometimes we experience the kind of change or upheaval that is marked by a departure from life as it has been. There is no going back and no discernible path forward. It’s like the proverbial night sea journey. Carl Jung talks about it as kind of a descent into Hades — to the land of ghosts somewhere beyond this world and beyond consciousness. Whenever I have a character in my art holding a salamander, it’s there to help find the way forward.

We were lost.

We Were Lost


Sylvia Taylor is one of eight gallery artists represented by Main Street Arts. She is featured in the exhibition CULTIVATE which runs April 7 through May 18, 2018. More information about Sylvia and her work can be found on our website. View more pieces by Sylvia Taylor on the gallery’s Artsy page.