Tag Archives: cut paper

Meet the Artist in Residence: Marisa Boyd

Marisa Boyd, artist in residence at Main Street Arts, during the month of May 2018, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Marisa some questions about her work and studio practice:

marisa boyd

Marisa Boyd

Q: Tell us about your background.
I am from Central Illinois, living in the town of Bloomington-Normal. I am originally from Channahon, IL which is near Joliet, IL. I moved to Bloomington-Normal in 2013 to attend college at Illinois State University for my BFA. Now that I am graduated, I enjoy reading a number of books I have laid out throughout my apartment and keeping a daily drawing practice. I spend my days walking throughout the downtown area of Bloomington and sharing an art studio with my best friend.

Q: How long have you been making artwork?
I have always been making art since I was a child. Moving forward into high school, I focused on more realism and narrative scenes. During the beginning of art school, my practice began to shift into abstraction. I went to Illinois State University for art school.

"Nothing Entirely Surprising" by Marisa Boyd

“Nothing Entirely Surprising” by Marisa Boyd

Q: What was your experience like at art school?
My experience was the most beautiful, busy, stressful part of my life that I have encountered so far. I have never not slept so much, staying up all hours of the night obsessing over the latest idea that popped into my brain.…which would word vomit to anyone I began talking to about art to in the hallway. I was similar to many former and current art students being willing to do anything to get further into their inquiry while simultaneously feeling like there was more that could be done. I still struggle with this today. Ultimately, I met incredible people and artists that have influenced me throughout my time at Illinois State University.

Q: Do you have a job other than making art?
I am a server at a farm to table restaurant called Anju Above in Bloomington, IL. On most days, I actually really enjoy my job!

Q: How would you describe your work?
I would describe it to be quiet with a hint of distress. I make simple drawings that are made with a micron pen. As well as shape cutouts that are made of wood, fiber board, paper, or fabric. I embrace simple gestures. My typical subject matter is abstract focusing on the “activity” of marks rather than an image.

Marisa Boyd

Marisa Boyd

 Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
For two years I have been developing a personal drawing practice that engages me to seek a space within myself. Creating “Closed Eye” drawings is meditative that focuses on silence and my ability to see, hear, and feel my surroundings. I wait for the after image behind my eyelids to disappear, then I seek out shapes and specific colors. My closed eye drawings are my primary source material for creating larger works out of plywood, fiberboard, paper, etc. I cut into the drawings to create a hole and have a whole shape remaining.

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
I tend to plan too much, I set far too many goals instead of focusing on one or two things to work on. I have had a sketchbook project in my mind for the past month that I can’t wait to get the time to complete. In addition, my goal is to create as many paper drawing/ paintings as possible. I hope to find some material that will speak to me in a way that urges me to use my jigsaw to cut it into a shape with beveled edges. I am bringing a collection of velvet fabrics that are waiting to be the covering of a shape or used as a atmospheric ground.

Work by Marisa Boyd

Work by Marisa Boyd

Q: What is the most useful tool in your studio?
I call it my “sharp tool,” although I believe it is for printmaking. I stumbled upon it at the DickBlick outlet in Galesburg, IL. This tool lead me to a revelation with my work. I began to scratch lines into paper and tear it creating sharp openings. The lines became an outline for cutting out a shape around the contour of the drawing.

Q: Do you collect anything?
I collect a variety of objects. My rock collection began at an early age and I still have the same jar containing the rocks from when I was a child. I look at the ground often when I walk, which leads me to collecting natural objects and photographs of them with their surroundings. The strangest thing I collect is lint from when I dry my clothes in the dryer. I began doing this in the beginning of 2017 thinking about my body and what covers it. I held attachment to lint because of the various colors of fibers and the shape it makes.

Q: Who is your favorite artist and why?
Eva Hesse is my favorite artist. Her approach to Abstract Expression inspires me to not reject that label. The artwork existed in that realm while also developing into something of its own. Her persistence is an inspiration to me. I love that she explored drawing, painting and sculpture. During the last five years of her life, she produced so many incredible works of art. I have traveled to the MoMA, Seattle Art Museum, and Milwaukee Art Museum to see her artwork in person.

"Vital" by Marisa Boud

“Vital” by Marisa Boud

Q: What’s next for you?
Simply put…a road trip back to Illinois.

Q: Where else can we find you?
I can be found on Instagram @artsymars and at www.marisaboyd.com

Meet the Artist in Residence: Cathy Gordon

Cathy Gordon. artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the month of June 2017, is working on mixed media paintings and cut paper pieces. We asked her a few questions about her artwork and studio practice:

Cathy Gordon working in her studio at Main Street Arts

Cathy Gordon working in her studio at Main Street Arts

Q: To start off, please you tell us about your background.
While I grew up on Air Forces bases across the United States and always created art, my love affair with art began when my parents divorced. My father moved to Chicago and my mother, my sisters, brother, and I moved to western Kansas. I know that sounds odd because you would not associate art with a small town in Kansas but it was a critical time in my life and as it happened the high school art teacher in that small town was a truly great art teacher (and a gifted artist in his own right!). I can’t begin to tell you how many of his students went on to become artists, art teachers, designers, photographers etc… He continues to mentor me to this day.

I went on to paint, draw, and print my way through the University of Kansas and I eventually obtained my Master of Fine Arts from Fort Hays State University, a small school in Kansas with an exceptional art program. Once again, I was fortunate that my drawing professor, who became an important mentor in my life, taught by example. She was a great artist and held her students to very high standards.

My experiences with these two great teachers made me realize that not only did I want to teach but I had to “walk the walk” for myself as well as my students. I knew my students needed to see me create art. I have taught full-time at the college level for twenty-five years and have always used an active studio approach to my classes.

CathyGordonCutPaper

Cut paper piece by Cathy Gordon

Q: How would you describe your work?
My work has always been influenced by mathematics, Constructivist design aesthetics, and classical subject matter but most recently I have been inspired by the book, Visual Complexity, Mapping Patterns of information, by Manuel Lima. I am currently working on a series of cut paper drawings and mixed media collages that use the connecting lines and coordinates of mapping. Each coordinate represents a person, encounter, event, or transpiring moment in my life. The lines soon became a metaphor for the transience of life and our congruence with one another.

Cathy's workspace in her studio

Cathy’s workspace in her studio

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
For me, the process of creating a work of art is ongoing. I can’t turn it on and off. I am constantly contemplating a work of art whether it is in its early stages or almost completed.  It is a little embarrassing to tell you this, but I lay in bed at night thinking about artwork that I am either struggling with or considering. There is no question that the most important aspect of creation is to listen. If you truly listen to the artwork it will guide you.

On a practical note regarding creativity, it is imperative that you work on this process every day. The best-case scenario is to be in the studio working every day but if that doesn’t happen you still need to have your head in your work whether it is searching for ideas, taking notes, journaling, or exploring. We all hit creative road blocks. I once had a teacher tell me that when I feel empty and I don’t think I have anything to give, pick up a pen and draw straight lines. Keep drawing the lines as a form of meditation and the next thing you know you will be drawing. It works!

"Pear With a Five", mixed media painting by Cathleen Gordon

“Pear With a Five”, mixed media painting by Cathy Gordon

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
A: There is no question that my main goal for this residency is to create and produce art. This residency is a gift. It is a such a joy to walk into the studio and not have any of my regular life demands trying to draw me away from the studio. I am usually pretty good at dedicating time to creating art everyday but to have all day, every day to work has been nothing short incredible.

Creativity is often nurtured through experience and the fact that I came here from Texas is in and of itself, an experience. I am calling my month here, “Zen and the Art of Art.” I am looking at art along the way, creating art in the studio, meeting new people, seeing new landscapes and just trying to absorb the experiences.

I am working on both painted mixed media and cut paper projects while I am at Main Street Arts and I am working on incorporated mapping and charting into the works.

Q: What’s next for you?
A: I am a drawing and painting professor by day and an artist by night. And while that will continue, I am changing the location. As soon as I get back to Texas I will be packing up and moving to a new college in Kansas where I have accepted a new position. The adventure continues!

Q: Where else can we find you?
A: Check out my website at cathleengordonart.com

View and purchase a selection of Cathy’s work at the gallery and in our online shop