Tag Archives: Drawing

Inside (or outside) the Artist’s Studio with Andy Reddout

Andy’s artwork is on view in “Sketchbooks: Genine Carvalheira-Gehman and Andy Reddout” in our second floor gallery. His work is available for purchase in our Online Shop:
store.mainstreetartsgallery.com


Sketching in the back fields at The Apple Farm in Victor NY

Sketching in the back fields at The Apple Farm in Victor NY

I grew up in Victor NY, and attended Victor High School. After taking all of the art courses Victor had to offer I attended SUNY Cortland to become an art teacher. After realizing they threw out my major and didn’t tell me, I enrolled in their Studio Art program. During that time my printmaking professor introduced me to the graphic design program at RIT. The day after graduating from RIT I was fortunate enough to get my first job as an Art Director in the local advertising scene. I made TV commercials, ads, web sites, logos and billboards for international and local companies. After about eight years of working twelve hour days, weekends and holidays I needed a change. I eventually quit, got my Masters in Art Education from RIT (again), and became an art teacher. For the past 10 years I taught K-5 elementary art in Bloomfield NY, coached basketball, soccer and tennis. This past year I made the switch to Victor Senior High School where I teach Studio Art and Computer Generated Art. I also coach Modified Boys Basketball and Modified Boys Tennis.

Sketching at the Public Market, Rochester NY.

Sketching at the Public Market, Rochester NY.

I don’t want label myself as a “sketchbook artist” because it seems to take away from what I love to do which is capturing moments as I see them. If I don’t have my whole sketching kit with me–I can be found having a sketchbook and pen handy. I like to arrive early to doctor’s appointments and sketch the other patients, take an extra half an hour at Wegmans, or sit quietly in the corner of my favorite restaurant sketching away. I find I love layovers in airports since I started sketching–when people are engrossed in technology they make great models!

A majority of my drawings are made “en plein air” which is a term reserved for painting outdoors, or on-site. I will start and finish my drawings on-site and if my model moves, or a car parks in front of my subject–so be it!

A detail of my ever-expanding drawing kit.

A detail of my ever-expanding drawing kit.

Since I am drawing and painting on location my sketching tools have to be portable and reliable. I use a handful of different fountain pens filled with different colored inks–some of which are water-soluable and make for great effects. My watercolor kit contains 24 colors with emphasis on the primary colors (I have 9 different blues!) I have a few travel brushes, as well as some water brushes with water in the handles for quick painting. I rarely sketch in pencil first, but when I do I use some overpriced pencil I bought in Paris. My sketchbook choice took some twists and turns but after some amazing customer service and paper quality that can’t be beat, I use Stillman & Birn sketchbooks. I am a huge fan of their “Beta” paper which is an extra heavy weight paper ideal for watercolor and general abuse. I put all of this in my trusty Timbuk2 bag which has been to different countries, had coffee spilled in it, and pins pierced through the flap from where my sketches have taken me.

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When I started sketching I stayed away from people and anything people related. Instead, I focused a lot on objects and places. Whenever I attempted to sketch people they turned out like cartoon characters and lacked expression. So for a year I focused on sketching people only and failed over and over again. I even took a portrait drawing class trying to overcome my fear. So if you look back on my sketches in book #2–my people are very-remedial and limited in scope. And now I feel as if I can capture a person’s likeness and emotion light-years beyond where I was.

A sketch on the streets of Montefioralle, Italy

A sketch on the streets of Montefioralle, Italy

Sketching for me is a way to capture life’s moments in a more meaningful way than a snap of a camera. With all of my sketches–and with great detail–I can recall who I was with, the weather, our conversations–even what I was wearing that day. I’ve been fortunate enough to have travelled to Europe and have sketched my way through the trips. A camera is an easy way to capture a moment and often a forgotten memento. But with my constant drawing these sketchbooks turn into prized possessions that tell a story. A recorded history. Moments in time. So as I progress, I’d just very simply like to continue to do what I am doing. Draw.

Captured on a sketchcrawl through Rochester, NY

Captured on a sketchcrawl through Rochester, NY

I get a lot of my inspiration from other artists that are sketching on location. Finding UrbanSketchers.org has changed the world of sketching for me. There are numerous links to artists, techniques and tools. You can get lost in there for days! I will be attending their UrbanSketchers Symposium this July in Chicago. Every year they pick a different city and this year is finally back in the states. I will have the chance to meet–and take classes from–a few of the “urban sketching all stars” that I look up to. Meeting and talking with other artists is a major influence and part of what makes this process so fun.

Sketching at the Cajun Jam at Coffee Connections

Sketching at the Cajun Jam at Coffee Connections

I attempt to maintain a blog of my work and travels: reddout.blogspot.com but Instagram (areddout) has made it more enjoyable to post art work and interact with other artists. With Instagram I’ve been able to meet other artists I admire, and actually got to go sketch with two of them while visiting Barcelona!


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Andy’s artwork in “Sketchbooks: Genine Carvalheira-Gehman and Andy Reddout” in our second floor gallery from  February 25–March 31, 2017. Visit his website at www.reddout.blogspot.com and follow Andy on Instagram @areddout.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by photographer Jenn Libby.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Anne Muntges

Anne’s artwork is on view in “Trying to Understand the World: Artwork by Anne Muntges and Sylvia Taylor”. The exhibition runs from January 14 2017–February 17, 2017. Her work is available for purchase in our Online Shop: store.mainstreetartsgallery.com


Anne Muntges Artist Extraordinaire

I am obsessed with drawing. I doodle, make marks, and slap line after line down on paper and board. Drawing is the way in which I see the world and understand myself within it.

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In general, when developing work, I have focus on the home as a theme. In earlier works this would mean recreating the space I physically occupied. Often that meant reflecting upon houses I lived in through drawings that explored the possibilities of what was and what could be. In Buffalo, where I began these works, it was easy to find crazy ornate homes to explore and occupy. My life was interior, and I spent a lot of time indoors. The work was fitting to the place I found myself in!

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That definition has grown over the last year or two though, as I have found myself traveling more for residencies and projects. My practice was also greatly impacted by moving to Brooklyn in January of 2016. Rather than finding myself in a constant indoor space to reflect in, like I had in Buffalo, I wander around and explore.

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The drawings for the show Trying to Understand the World are a reflection of me figuring out my new home. These drawings helped me to understand the space I live in more closely than I ever could have imagined.


Stop by Main Street Arts to see “Trying to Understand the World: Artwork by Anne Muntges and Sylvia Taylor”. The exhibition runs through February 17, 2017. Anne’s work is available for purchase in our online shop: store.mainstreetartsgallery.com. Visit Anne’s website at www.annemuntges.com.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by painter Victoria Brzustowicz.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Megan Armstrong

Megan’s artwork is on view in our juried exhibition “Small Works 2016”. Her work is available for purchase in our Online Gallery Shop:
store.mainstreetartsgallery.com


Artist Statement:
A line is a critical tool for communication – whether compositionally visual or textual, a line connected to another line creates a navigational thread to follow – this thread can be woven in and out as a form of coded language – the duplicity of a line is directly linked to the formation and understanding of words – whether drawn or written, a line can develop into structures, systems, labels, and powerful (perhaps dangerous) associations – associations spur emotional, factual, and fallible interpretations and translations – lines act as evidence of human thought – definitions, synonyms, organizations – lines slide back and forth to create new relationships, pairings, combinations, composites, connections – the limitlessness of the line is linked with it’s limitations – through repetitive, compulsive exploration and manipulation of lines I investigate notions of normalcy by examining the narrative lines between fiction and reality.

Through practical and emotional research of a specific system – mental illness and the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Version 5 (DSM-V) – I create artwork that translates the coded language within the system, as well as the individual experiences that are left out of the clinical translation of human behavior. When a system and it’s coding logic is laboriously translated into didactic lines that weave in and out, attempting individuality, but ultimately creating controlled chaos, the complexity and ambiguity of a convoluted system remains.  

Work in Progress

Megan Armstrong in her studio drawing lines for a work in progress.

For the past three years my work has focused on the exploration of lines, as a form of communication, translation, and investigation of systems and mark-making. While the width and style of the line remains consistent in each drawing, it is important that every endeavor is a challenge, whether in content or form.

Artist Studio

Megan Armstrong’s home studio.

This past summer I moved to Rochester, NY, and set up a temporary artist studio in my home. The second I step into the house I am reminded of the art I have made in the past, current pieces, and the type of work I would like to attempt in the future.

Nomenclature, 2016, Ink and graphite drawing on paper, 36"H x 42"W

Nomenclature, 2016, Ink and graphite drawing on paper, 36″H x 42″W

Hanging above my makeshift drawing table is Nomenclature, a drawing I started at the Byrdcliffe Artist Residency in Woodstock, New York in 2015, and completed in 2016. The drawing is created by individual ink lines woven together. The background was laboriously hand-drawn, erased, and re-worked in graphite.

A Reductionistic Anachronism, 2016, Ink drawings on paper, Eighteen individual 12"H x 12"W drawings

A Reductionistic Anachronism, 2016, Ink drawings on paper, Eighteen individual 12″H x 12″W drawings

Resting on the drawing table is a work in progress titled A Reductionistic Anachronism. This piece was started with the simple and necessary idea of individual drawings building and creating a larger drawing. I was in the process of moving and had packed up all of my larger works and tools, except for my micron pens. I began working on a 12″ x 12″ drawing with the intention that it would connect to another, and another, and another… In a grouping of 18 drawings as shown it measures a total of 36″H x 72″. This drawing will continue to grow indefinitely.

The Clear Virtue of Creating a Common Language (106), 2016, Ink drawing on paper, 12"H x 12"W

The Clear Virtue of Creating a Common Language (106), 2016, Ink drawing on paper, 12″H x 12″W

The drawing shown above was created for the Small Works 2016 Exhibit at Main Street Arts. I challenged myself to take content I had previously worked on in a large scale, to the restricted dimensions of 12″H x 12″W. The drawing created for Small Works 2016, which won the Director’s Choice Award, features 106 lines total, signifying the amount of mental disorders defined by the first version of the DSM. The piece is an iteration of a drawing I created for my MFA Thesis at San Francisco Institute of Art, title The Clear Virtue of Creating a Common Language for Communication (pictured below). The entire drawing includes 394 hand-drawn ink lines, depicting the number of current codes for diagnosing mental illness, as categorized by the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Version 5 (DSM-V). These pieces were created line by line, and each line is numbered, with a clear beginning and end. This means that you can follow one line in it’s entirety. In both drawings there seems to be a clear form, although abstract, when viewed from a distance. The closer you get to the drawings, the easier it is to see the distinctions between each line, the connections and interactions, as well as the varying paths traveled. Each line is completely unique and wholly individual, yet viewed on the same page and in the same space, they begin to seem the same and it is more difficult to clearly define them as separate.

The Clear Virtue of Creating a Common Language for Communication, 2016, Ink drawing on paper, 48"H x 48"W

The Clear Virtue of Creating a Common Language for Communication, 2016, Ink drawing on paper, 48″H x 48″W

Line Theory, 2015, ink drawings on paper, artist book, 7" x 8.5" x .5"

Line Theory, 2015, ink drawings on paper, artist book, 7″ x 8.5″ x .5″

Line Theory is a hand-drawn and hand-written artist book I created in collaboration with photographer Brian Dean, who beautifully hand-bound each book. Each page features a “chapter” and corresponding line drawing. The book holds 28 complete chapters (original poetry) and line drawings (the drawings grow from one line to twenty-eight lines). Line Theory is a limited edition of six, and each book in the edition features completely different drawings.


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Megan’s work in our current exhibition “Small Works 2016” (juried by Bleu Cease, Executive Director/Curator of RoCo; exhibition runs through January 6th). Megan’s work is available in our Online Gallery Shop: store.mainstreetartsgallery.com. Visit her website at http://www.meganarmstrongart.com and follow her on Instagram @meganarmstrongart.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by ceramic artist Renee LoPresti.

Meet the Artist in Residence: James Mikhel Emerson

James Mikhel Emerson is an artist in residence at Main Street Arts! He’s working in one of our two studio spaces during the month of August 2016 (you can stop by the gallery to see his studio and work in progress). We asked James a few questions about his artwork, life, and more:

Artist in residence James Mikhel Emerson

Artist in residence James Mikhel Emerson in his studio at Main Street Arts

Q: Where are you from?

A: I’m from a real small town called Candler, in the heartland. It’s actually an unincorporated borough, just like one that I passed real close to Clifton Springs.

"The Totem Can Project" by James Mikhel Emerson

“The Totem Can Project” by James Mikhel Emerson

Q: How long have you been making artwork?

A: I’ve been making art my whole life. Both of my parents were artist craftsmen, so I started very early in clay and paint. Later, I moved to New York City and studied traditional drawing, painting, and advanced mixed media at the Art Students League in Manhattan.

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Q: How would you describe your work? What is your preferred medium and your typical subject matter?

A: Primitive Surrealism is a term I like. I work with concepts and styles that extend across generations; things that humans can relate to regardless of time and place.

Somebody else just asked me what my preferred medium is, and I’ve been thinking about it. It’s sculpture when coupled with drawing and painting. I usually draw to absorb and explore different styles, and then sort of port that over into sculptures through a lot of different means.

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Q: Do you collect artwork?

A: I do, very occasionally. I have a couple of very cool prints, a coke bottle, some small stone objects, and a wooden piece of a new alphabet created by a great artist, Esteban Patiño. I also have a small collection of artwork that I found around NYC over the years, which was created by #FAF and #FreeArtsMovement artists. Some of it’s good stuff.

Q: Where are your favorite places to see artwork?

A: Good question. My favorite places are anywhere art doesn’t normally occur, so outside of galleries, museums, etc. I have participated in the #FAF as I mentioned before, and have left a bunch of small sculptures in public places for people to find and to hold, so I get a kick when I find other artists doing that as well.

A recent public sculpture by James in Riverside Park South in Manhattan

A recent public sculpture by James in Riverside Park South in Manhattan

Q: What are your goals for this residency? Tell us about your current projects.

A: Right now I am working on a new series of paintings and sculptures which use old visual language to present contemporary life. I’m using a bunch of styles to create contemporary symbols and representational imagery with which to talk about the world we live in.

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Q: What advice would you give to other artists?

A: Seek the deeper function of art. Ask “What does art do for us humans, why do we keep creating it?” It is a question that is as old as us and is absolutely relevant today. See how far you can go to find your answer.

Q: What’s next for you? 

A: I think I’m gonna drive over to New York to the Wassaic Project. There are some folks over there that I’m hoping to see.

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Q: Where else can we find you?

A: You can see more of my artwork at www.jamesmikhel.com. I’m also on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram as @JamesMikhel.


Sign up for a Social Media for Artists Workshop with James Mikhel Emerson! In this workshop, James will discuss different social media platforms and strategies for creating platform-specific content. Increase your reach and get your work in front of collectors, galleries, and more! Saturday, August 20, 2016 from 12-3pm. $25 per person. Call, email, or stop in to sign up today.

Are you an artist looking for new opportunities? Apply for a residency at Main Street Arts! Artists in residence will have 24-hour access to a large studio on our second floor (with great natural light), the option to show work in the gallery, and the opportunity to teach paid workshops. Submissions are reviewed and awarded on an ongoing basis.

Inside The Artist’s Studio with Lana Grauer

My studio is the great outdoors.  Standing alone in a forest or meadow in the warm morning sun behind my easel is my favorite way to start a day and a new painting. I have a number of favorite places near my home in Mamaroneck, NY including Otter Creek and The Marshlands Conservancy.  However the best scenery and inspiration for me is found in the Finger Lakes. I am a pastel landscape painter.  Here I am painting near a vineyard on Keuka Lake with my dog, Annie. Tip #1  Don’t ever tie your dog to your easel while you are painting.

Plein air painting with my dog, Annie

Plein air painting with my dog, Annie

My paintings are about 80% complete when I leave my painting location and head home.  The remaining 20% is called the resolution phase which involves critiquing the composition and tweaking color values. This typically involves me sitting in a chair in my studio and staring at the painting for about 10 minutes until the weak areas become apparent to me.  Most of the time I can improve a painting by adding more drama by exaggerating the value differences. If I am troubled by a larger area I will use a stiff brush and brush off the area outside.  Most of the pastel will come off the paper and I can proceed on a different path with that part of the painting.  Lastly I refer to my Check Off List.

Lana Grauer, "White Cliffs", pastel on paper, 17" x 14", 2015.

Lana Grauer, “White Cliffs”, pastel on paper, 17″ x 14″, 2015.

Lana’s Check Off List

  1. Are the colors in the foreground of greater intensity than the background?
  2. Is the back ground neutral enough?
  3. Are the edges sharp in the foreground and blurred in the background?
  4. What is my point of interest?
  5. Is the eye drawn back into the painting?
  6. Are there sufficient differences in value?

Here are some photos of my studio.  Notice the flat drawers for storing paper and work in progress. The vertical slots are great for storing framed pieces. I converted a closet into shelf space for storing frames, shipping boxes and my plein air backpack.

Grauer Studio

Grauer Studio

Studio #2

Stop by Main Street Arts to see Lana’s artwork in our current exhibition, Fifty Landscapes (runs through May 13). View her work online at www.lanagrauer.com. Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by painter Lanna Pejovic.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Jean K Stephens

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The foundation for my artwork was laid in childhood–a mix of nature and art.  Growing up in Gates, a rural suburb of Rochester, New York, I spent hours out of doors climbing trees, playing in fields and streams, my home surrounded by my Mother’s flower gardens.  I loved to color and was a happy girl with a new coloring book and a fresh box of Crayola crayons.  I would carefully shade and layer colors while “staying inside the lines” to create realistic pictures.  An early drawing tool was in my hand and a love of nature was in my soul.

I attended Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, NY earning a BFA in printmaking and painting.  A Masters in Art Education gave me the taste for teaching and I worked briefly in public school.  I enjoyed teaching printmaking and figure drawing and contributing graphic design to Allofus Art Workshop, a community workshop in Rochester in the early 1980’s.

Along the way, I worked as a freelance graphic artist designing catalogs and brochures and illustrating greeting cards and calendars for local and national clients.

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My concentration for the last twenty five years has been fine art.  From study with Tom Insalaco, Tom Buechner, John Whalley, and Carol Marine I have gained valuable knowledge in painting techniques and approaches to subject matter.  My paintings have been selected for national juried exhibitions and are included in private and corporate collections, notably Canandaigua National Bank branches.

View From Bald Hill, oil on canvas

View From Bald Hill, oil on canvas

My representational oil landscapes have been inspired by the rolling hills of the NYS Southern Tier and Finger Lakes, the seasonal changes of the farmlands around my home in Honeoye Falls and the rocky coast of Maine, all of which suggest a feminine form.

Blue Edge, oil on canvas

Blue Edge, oil on canvas

JEANONROCKS  I frequently create plein air studies, and take photos, which provide valuable reference for completing a larger studio painting.

In my still life drawings and paintings found natural forms are placed upon discarded man made surfaces inviting examination of the relationship to what both man and nature leave behind.  Once I’ve selected objects to work with I arrange and light them, a process that can take several hours and often reveals something unexpected.

set up for Blessing

set up for Blessing

Drawing and oil painting entitled Blessed

Drawing and oil painting entitled Blessed

I make thumbnail sketches and a finished value drawing.  The drawing is then transferred to canvas or panel with a grid, where a grisaille begins the painting process.  I use a limited palette of M Graham oil paint in warm and cool primary colors and white to complete the oil painting, applying “pieces of color” to render form.

CPENCILS1For my colored pencil drawings I favor Canson Mi Tientes colored paper and Prismacolor pencils which I use to build up layers of color and value.

Whether I’m painting in the field or in my studio, the solitude I experience is soothing and meditative.  This is the grace of being an artist, to lose oneself in the act of creating.  When that good flow exists, the paintings seem to paint themselves and the harmony within shows on the canvas.

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I am continually amazed at the beauty that comes through my hand from the marriage of my heart and the spirit of nature.  To be able to express this unique vision is a privileged gift I offer to the world.  My hope is that these drawings and paintings provide a place for the viewer to stop, take a deep breath, savor some of nature’s peace and find a stillness within.

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Works Road Studio classroom

I offer instruction in colored pencil drawing and oil painting in my Works Road Studio.  Using still life as subject, students sharpen their observation skills, focus on establishing strong compositions and learn to render form in color.

Denis McLaughlin painting

Denis McLaughlin painting

My students are encouraged to develop their own personal style.  I provide a nurturing atmosphere, gently guiding artistic growth in technique and expression.  Students receive plenty of individual attention, instructive demonstrations and critique.  The warm camaraderie among the students makes it safe to ask questions and take risks.

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For more information on Jean K Stephens’s artwork and classes visit her website at www.jeankstephens.com. Stop by Main Street Arts to see her painting “Open House” in our current juried exhibition, Structurally Speaking.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by Ithaca artist Chris Oliver.

2015 Workshops

Call or email the gallery for more info and to reserve your spot in our workshops, camps, and drawing sessions.

April

Drawing with Coffee
Saturday, April 18, 2015  |  10 a.m.–12 p.m.
$15/person (includes materials and pastries)
Drawing with a variety of materials, including coffee, while enjoying coffee and sweets. This monthly workshop will focus on the experience of drawing in a relaxed and casual environment. Call or email the gallery for more info and to reserve your spot!

May

Drawing with Coffee: Perspective
Saturday, May 16, 2015  |  10 a.m.–12 p.m.
$15/person (includes materials and pastries)
Draw in a relaxed and casual environment while sipping coffee and eating pastries! This month the focus will be on using perspective to draw buildings in downtown Clifton Springs from the balcony at Main Street Arts.

Workshop: Stretching a Canvas
Saturday, May 23, 2015  |  1–3 p.m.
$25/person (includes materials)
Stretching a canvas is a basic skill that every artist should have! This workshop will teach you all you need to know about this valuable skill and you will leave with fresh canvases ready for painting.

June

Watercolor Workshops: $25 per session or $60 for all three (includes materials)

Workshop: Watercolor Basics
Saturday, June 13, 2015  |  1–3 p.m.
Learn the basics of watercolor painting, including how to choose and prepare your paper, the properties of watercolor paint, how to mix and layer colors, and more.

Workshop: Watercolor Still Life
Saturday, June 20, 2015  |  1–3 p.m.
Learn new watercolor techniques by painting a still life from direct observation. This workshop will focus on value ranges and textures.

Workshop: Plein Air Watercolor
Saturday, June 27, 2015  |  1–3 p.m.
In this workshop create plein air watercolor paintings in beautiful downtown Clifton Springs. Paint from buildings, foliage, and more.

July

Student Art Camp!
$15 per session or $50 for all four
Afternoon art sessions at Main Street Arts for students in grades 6–12. Projects will include portrait painting, drawing from life, and most importantly using your imagination!
Grades 6–8: July 7, 9, 14, 16, 1–3pm
Grades 9-12: July 21, 23, 28, 30, 1–3pm

Drawing with Coffee: Flowers and Plants
Saturday, July 18, 2015  |  10 a.m.–12 p.m.
$10/person (includes materials and pastries)
Draw in a relaxed and casual environment while sipping coffee and eating pastries! We will be drawing flowers for this month’s session in the garden across the street at Warfield’s.

Workshop: Bookbinding with Bradley Butler
Saturday, July 25, 2015  |  1–3 p.m.
Make your own sketch book or journal in this hands-on introduction to bookbinding. You will learn variations on the basic pamphlet stitch and leave with some small notebooks and a larger sketchbook or journal.

September

Drawing with Coffee
Saturday, September 19, 2015  |  10 a.m.–12 p.m.
$15/person (includes materials and pastries)

October

Drawing with Coffee
Saturday, October 17, 2015  |  10 a.m.–12 p.m.
$15/person (includes materials and pastries)

Workshop: Mask Making for Kids
Saturday, October 24, 2015  |  1–3 p.m.

November

Drawing with Coffee
Saturday, November 21, 2015  |  10 a.m.–12 p.m.
$15/person (includes materials and pastries)

December

Workshop: Decorating Paper with Bradley Butler
Saturday, December 19, 2015  |  1–3 p.m.
$25/person (includes materials)
Try your hand at designing your own decorative paper! In this two hour workshop you will use stamping and marbling techniques to make beautiful papers to use as gift wrapping or as works of art all on their own. Call or email the gallery to sign up. (please note that this is not a “paper-making” class, we will be decorating commercially made papers)

View our full list of events here: Events
View our list of Free Monthly Film Screenings here: Film Screenings

Small Works: A National Juried Exhibition of Artwork 12″ or Less

Join us for the opening of our Small Works exhibition, Saturday, November 8, 4–7p.m!

129 works of art by 90 artists from across the country.

129 works of art by 90 artists from across the country.

Small Works includes 129 works of art, 12″ or less, in a variety of media by 90 artists from across the country. $1,000 in cash awards will be announced at the opening.

Exhibition Dates: November 8–December 29, 2014
Opening Reception: Saturday, November 8, 4–7p.m.

Artists included:
Atsuko Chirikjian, Alice Chen, Anne Punzi, Brock Flamion, Brad Daruszka, Bethany Haeseler, Carol Acquilano, Cheryl Dawdy, Chalda Maloff, Colleen Pendry, Cathleen Ryan, Craig Wilson, Doug Frohman, Domingo Parada, Denise VanDeroef, Elizabeth Andrews, Fumiko Kashiwagi, George Lorio, Gabriella Soraci, Geoffrey Stein, George Wallace, Harriet Heller, Hannah Lightbody, Ileen Kaplan, Judi Cermak, Julian Cartwright, JoAnn Gentle, Justyn Iannucci, Jennifer Kotler, James Mai, Jacquelyn O’Brien, Jim Pearson, John Ruggles, Joe Tarantelli, Jane Zich, Katherine Baca, Kathryn Bevier, Kristine DeNinnio, Katelyn Jurney, Kevin Stuart, Kenneth Townsend, Lauren Furushima, Lanna Pejovic, Larry Poole, Katharine Wood, Mary Begley, Madalyn LaCava, Maria Victoria Savka, Marissa Tirone, Mari Takagi, Michele Vair, Margaret Wilson, Mark Zeh, Nancy Hicks, Namdoo Kim, Owen Karrel, Phyllis Bryce Ely, Peter Bucklin, Paige Kleinfelder, Patti Miskell, Peter Russom, Robert Fiacco, Ryan Hoevenaar, Ryosuke Kumakura, Roberta Kappel, Rebecca Strohm, Rikki Van Camp, Sarah Arditti, Sara Basher, Sage Churchill-Foster, Samara Doumnande, Sofie Hodara, Susan Kaye, Stephen Komp, Stacy Liberati, Shannon McDonell, Simone Ochrym, Steven Piotrowski, Sean M. Witucki, Taylor Kennedy, Trisha Max, Terry Oakden, Trina Smith, Virginia Cassetta, Vincent Leandro, Vanessa Rivera, William Barkin, William Holowka, Yoon Jee Kwak, Zach Dietl

This is our first national juried exhibition and we can’t wait to see all of the work up on Main Street Arts’ walls! Stay tuned for more information about Small Works, as well as images of select pieces.

BLOOM, etc. by Kevin Harwood

Kevin Harwood’s exhibit “BLOOM, etc” Upstairs at Main Street Arts features a selection of drawings from the artist’s self published Illuminated Magazine, BLOOM, along with watercolor paintings.

Kevin Harwood, "Bloom"

Kevin Harwood, “Bloom”

Harwood’s paintings provide a humorous take on life in the Finger Lakes, riffing on local characters and situations unique to the area.

Kevin Harwood, "Bloom"

Kevin Harwood, “Bloom”

Harwood’s refers to his watercolors as “Haiku watercolors”, because each painting is composed of only three to five brush strokes. These paintings are beautiful because they are so simple.

Kevin Harwood, Haiku Watercolor

Kevin Harwood, Haiku Watercolor

Stop by to see Kevin Harwood’s solo exhibition Upstairs at Main Street Arts! His work will be here through September 27, 2014. You can see more information about exhibitions at Main Street Arts here.

Exhibition Dates: August 5–September 27, 2014

“Metaphysical Musings” – Paintings, Drawings, & Collage by Lacey McKinney & Shannon Crandall

One of our current exhibitions Upstairs at Main Street Arts, Metaphysical Musings is a two-person show featuring paintings, drawings, and collage by Lacey McKinney and Shannon Crandall.

Lacey McKinney, Eviscera, oil on canvas

Lacey McKinney, Eviscera, oil on canvas

Shannon Crandall, Brave Intuition, acrylic & collage on canvas

Shannon Crandall, Brave Intuition, acrylic & collage on canvas

McKinney and Crandall both create works with lush, intricate surfaces. Whether they do so through thick brushstrokes and texture, or through delicate layering of color and paper, their mark-making is truly beautiful.

Metaphysical Musings isn’t just concerned with what’s on the surface, however. These works also focus on what’s just below or above the surface of what we look at. Metaphysics is a branch of philosophy concerned with explaining the fundamental nature of being and the world that encompasses it, these paintings make reference to this
in various ways.

Lacey McKinney, I Am You #7, powdered pigment on paper

Lacey McKinney, I Am You #7, powdered pigment on paper

Come check out the exhibit! Their work looks even more impressive in person. You can see more of Lacey McKinney’s work here and more of Shannon Crandall’s work here.

Exhibition Dates: June 6–July 26, 2014