Tag Archives: Main Street Arts

SelinJody_studio2

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Jody Selin

Until about the age of 6, I grew up in fairly rural area of Greensboro, North Carolina. My parents were avid gardeners and some of my fondest memories where of snapping green beans, skinned knees and following my parents around the yard, as they pruned and planted throughout the growing season.

Jody Selin working in her studio

Jody Selin working in her studio

There was plenty of land to roam as unsupervised kids and we took full advantage of it. If asked, we could recite the trees in our yard; cherry, pear, oak, dogwood and magnolias. It was here that I naturally developed a love of being outdoors, gardening and a fascination with plant and earth sciences. These earliest childhood impressions, along with a mother who encouraged creativity, are what I carry into my work today. 

Various pieces in progress

Various pieces in progress

So, for the better part of 20 plus years, I’ve been making art and choosing to live creatively. Originally, I came to Western New York to pursue my MFA in Ceramics at RIT’s School for American Craft, eventually settling in Buffalo, NY. Before this, I had traveled around the US and Caribbean for several years, where my natural inclination for plant biology overlapped with a love for the enormous plant growth and lush, saturation of the sub-tropics. The ecology of western NY has been just as inspiring, with the diverse hiking trails, rivers and Great Lakes. 

IMG_8459

Detail of “Entangled Growth” from CULTIVATE exhibition

"Medium Pollinator Cluster" from the CULTIVATE exhibition

“Medium Pollinator Cluster” from the CULTIVATE exhibition

Working with my hands, traveling, hiking and experiencing people and places outside of my direct understanding have always been an interest for me. At my best, I am curious. 

These recent works, featured in the CULTIVATE exhibition, are a reflection of this continued curiosity. Threads of previous works in content and style are always present although, I intentionally choose to pursue work that is continually explorative and in response to my direct natural environment. 


Jody Selin is one of eight gallery artists represented by Main Street Arts. She is featured in the exhibition CULTIVATE which runs April 7 through May 18, 2018. More information about Jody and her work can be found on our website. View more pieces byJody Selin on the gallery’s Artsy page.

"Bad Seed" by Chad Grohman

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Chad Grohman

Landscape by Chad Grohman

Landscape painting by Chad Grohman

I am from Buffalo, NY and have spent all but one year of my life there, minus the four years of undergrad at Rochester Institute of Technology. I didn’t really live in Rochester so much as the college itself, so I don’t really count that. My MFA was in a distance program so I stayed in Buffalo.

That being said, I have shown mostly in Rochester and other other cities besides Buffalo. As a commercial illustrator, I draw or paint many subjects in many media. When my personal artwork is shown in galleries, I tend to mostly paint landscapes. I paint landscapes because the landscape is where I prefer to be; outside. That’s the great thing about being an illustrator —as a freelancer, I can use what ever minutes I choose to be outside. While there walking or sitting, I began to draw and paint from life, as well as in the studio from photos. It was not until about 2010 that I really began painting landscapes.

Landscape by Chad Grohman

Landscape by Chad Grohman

Many years ago I began practicing and studying Buddhism. Outdoors is a wonderful place to practice. The school I belong to has a beautiful liturgy that is well suited for outdoors. Holding an outdoor service for the land and painting the land is an amazing combination.

School Days by Chad Grohman

“School Days” featured in the CULTIVATE exhibition at Main Street Arts

I am a Nichiren Shu novice Buddhist priest. In the CULTIVATE exhibition, I am showing artwork inspired by recent training trips to Japan — both rural and urban. The cats included in many of the pieces represent all realms of existence, primarily the bodhisattva (concern for others), human, animal, hell realms. The cats are spiritual — they suffer, they are beneficial, and are often confused.

"Original Disciples" by Chad Grohman

“Original Disciples” by Chad Grohman, included in the CULTIVATE exhibition

The artwork is mounted on cardboard. I prefer the basic nature of using cardboard and watercolor paper. I have long been attracted to and inspired by hobo art and the limited materials they use.

"Bad Seed" by Chad Grohman

“Bad Seed” by Chad Grohman, included in the CULTIVATE exhibtion


Chad Grohman is one of eight gallery artists represented by Main Street Arts. He is featured in the exhibition CULTIVATE which runs April 7 through May 18, 2018. More information about Chad and his work can be found on our website. View more pieces by Chad Grohman on the gallery’s Artsy page.

 

The finished print with blue, red and grey added by hand.

Inside The Artist’s Studio with Sylvia Taylor

Every spring the spotted salamanders migrate from the woods behind my home in Ithaca, New York.  We watch for them on rainy nights. With a flashlight you can see their little dinosaur bodies moving forward into the night.  My print called The Quickening,  was inspired by the salamander migration.

salamander night

A Little Dinosaur in the Garden

Most of my work is created by a process called relief printmaking. It involves carving a piece of wood or linoleum, rolling ink onto the surface, and then transferring the ink/image onto paper. The final print will be the mirror image of the carved plate.   My favorite part of the process is carving the plate.

But first, I must get the drawing onto the plate.

I often draw directly onto the linoleum plate.

I often draw directly onto the linoleum plate.

Now for the fun part!

Cutting the Lino

Cutting the Lino

More Cutting...

More Cutting…

When you first roll ink onto the plate, it seems to spring to life before your eyes.  I love this part.

The image comes to life and any areas that need to be tweaked show up clearly.

The image comes to life

The plate is inked up and ready to proof

The plate is inked up and ready to proof

Next step is printing. Here’s my press:

My Printing Press

My Printing Press

The Ink from the Lino Plate is Transferred to the Paper...

The Ink from the Lino Plate is Transferred to the Paper…

It typically takes a few days for the ink to dry, depending on the weather

It typically takes a few days for the ink to dry, depending on the weather.

Once they are dry, I can add color and experiment.

Painting spots...

Painting spots…

The final print:

The finished print with blue, red and grey added by hand.

The finished print, “The Quickening”,  with blue, red and grey added by hand.

The word quickening references the idea of something speeding up but it is also a word used in pregnancy for the first moment that a woman feels the baby move in utero. Because I was a midwife for many years, I especially love that double entendre. I frequently see the process of making art with midwife eyes. Birth metaphors always come to mind.

In this print I was interested in exploring a certain kind of psychological undercurrent. Sometimes we experience the kind of change or upheaval that is marked by a departure from life as it has been. There is no going back and no discernible path forward. It’s like the proverbial night sea journey. Carl Jung talks about it as kind of a descent into Hades — to the land of ghosts somewhere beyond this world and beyond consciousness. Whenever I have a character in my art holding a salamander, it’s there to help find the way forward.

We were lost.

We Were Lost


Sylvia Taylor is one of eight gallery artists represented by Main Street Arts. She is featured in the exhibition CULTIVATE which runs April 7 through May 18, 2018. More information about Sylvia and her work can be found on our website. View more pieces by Sylvia Taylor on the gallery’s Artsy page.

From The Director: Into the Unknown, Overlooked, and Unfamiliar

The three bodies of work presented in this exhibition are entirely different. Jasna Bogdanovska, Harry Littell, and Nigel Maister have each explored specific concepts through their imagery. Some are abstracted views of reality while others are a document of a specific time and place.

During the installation process of Unknown, Overlooked, and Unfamiliar

During the installation process of Unknown, Overlooked, and Unfamiliar

Although each body of work is different, there is an overlap between them and a connection from one idea to the next. The name of the show Unknown, Overlooked, and Unfamiliar comes from my thinking about each of the artists and distilling their ideas surrounding the work into one word.

The Liminal #31 and #32 by Nigel Maister

The Liminal #31 and #32 by Nigel Maister

Unknown pertains to Nigel’s work and the way that he is investigating the relationship between the real and the imagined. He is using abstracted views of branches, leaves, and other flora as a way to depict the unseen. By pushing the values and colors of his images taken in the dark of night, he creates new worlds that are neither completely real nor entirely a figment of his imagination. The Liminal #31 and #32, part of a larger series (The Liminal) show two sides of his intentions. Both of these images may exist in a dream but one is more like an overload of saturation and visual stimulation, while the other could be a foreboding scene from a nightmare. The push and pull between being overstated and understated is one of the interesting things about the series as a whole and it makes for a varied experience when taking in the exhibition.

Farm drainage tile, Romulus by Harry Littell

Farm drainage tile, Romulus by Harry Littell

Overlooked came to mind when thinking about Harry’s project. He is investigating the upstate NY landscape and the small towns that we live in, drive through, or remember from years past. His photographs sometimes document a rather lifeless subject in a way that brings a depth of possible meaning or emotion. In Farm drainage tile (Romulus), a simple bundle of drainage tile sitting in a field becomes many things all at once. It is a monolithic structure, it is a stand-in for a large bale of hay typically seen in a field, and it is also waiting to go in the ground for its intended purpose. Without Harry finding beauty or an interest in this image, we may have just driven by and not paid any attention.

"Palimpsest" by Jasna Bogdanovska

“Palimpsest” by Jasna Bogdanovska

Unfamiliar connects to something in Jasna’s images. She is investigating her own identity, a dual identity. Born in Macedonia but living in the United States, she found the exact geographic midpoint between her two homes in the town of Grindavík, Iceland. This place that was once unfamiliar to her now became the symbol of her dual identity and the springboard for a series of photographs. Through a layered symbolism, she explores personal stories and ideas that relate back to this. The image pictured above, Palimpsest consists of a book resting on a rock in a shallow body of water. The meaning of the title has to do with a change occurring to something (i.e. a piece of writing or a place, perhaps even a person) with the original still showing through after the revision. In a way, this could be a self portrait. The book may have originally been written to describe a person who was born and lived in Macedonia. Pages inside have then been erased and rewritten, describing someone who now lives in America. The book is resting on a rock, which may represent Iceland, the place that is in between.

Installation shot: Unknown, Overlooked, and Unfamiliar

Installation shot: Unknown, Overlooked, and Unfamiliar

So, even though Jasna, Harry, and Nigel make completely different work, the overlap between them is present in this exhibition. I would suggest seeing it in person to find your own parallels and connections. Stop in before the show closes at the end of the month!

Installation shot: Unknown, Overlooked, and Unfamiliar

Installation shot: Unknown, Overlooked, and Unfamiliar


See Unknown, Overlooked, and Unfamiliar at Main Street Arts through Friday, March 30, 2018. You can also preview the exhibition on Artsy: Artsy.net/mainstreetarts.

Inside the artist’s studio with Harry Littell

Exploring near Horseheads. Photo by Roger Freeman

Exploring near Horseheads. Photo by Roger Freeman

I live in Ithaca, NY, where I’m a teacher (Tompkins Cortland Community College) and fine art photographer. I think of my studio broadly as the upstate New York region. A sense of place is important in my work.

House with asphalt shingles and vinyl siding, Union Springs, 2016

House with asphalt shingles and vinyl siding, Union Springs, 2016

In 2016 I began a collaborative project with friend and writer Ron Ostman to explore the upstate cultural landscape including houses, schools, businesses, industries, theaters, signs, thrift stores, and places of worship.  The unadorned vernacular architecture of the old farm house above attracted me with the mundane beauty of its simple lines and patterns.

Rhinehart Sand and Gravel, Corning,2017

Rhinehart Sand and Gravel, Corning, 2017

We strove for a  focused aimlessness in our weekly treks. We had no fixed destination. The key was to stop. Often. A main interest became sites that reflect the flux of the built environment. We saw evidence of industries in decline or completely gone. The hulking rusted machinery at a gravel mining operation near Corning is a reminder of a different era.

Cayuga Milk Ingredients plant, Aurora, 2017

Cayuga Milk Ingredients plant, Auburn, 2017

We also saw new industry. The  Cayuga Milk Ingredients plant near Auburn is a high tech milk processing plant serving a collective of dairy farmers, its pristine facade rising above the surrounding agricultural land.

Petrified Creatures Museum, Richfield Springs

Petrified Creatures Museum, Richfield Springs, 2017

I keep my photo technique simple. For this project I used a full frame mirrorless digital camera and two manual focus prime lenses, a 35mm and a 50mm. Some of the artists I look to for inspiration include Walker Evans, Edward Hopper, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Stephen Shore, Alec Soth, Lee Friedlander, and Thomas Struth.

Elmira/Horseheads contact sheet

Elmira/Horseheads contact sheet

Double page spread

Double page spread

Towards the end of 2017 I began to put the project into book form.

InDesign layout in progress

InDesign layout in progress

I use InDesign to combine photographs and text. It’s challenging and fun to find visual and thematic connections between images. The screen grab above shows a glimpse of the process involved in finding a pair of images for a double-page spread. Images that don’t make the cut live in the limbo of the pasteboard outside the page layout. Ron wrote an introduction about our process and an afterward with thoughts on the state of upstate.

Storefronts

Storefronts

The shop signs in the photos above provided an idea for the title of the book, as seen in the cover image below.

Cover, UNROOM: New 2 U

Cover, UNROOM: New 2 U

I used MagCloud, a print on demand publisher, to print UNROOM: New 2 U.  Signed copies are available at Main Street Arts. The book can also be purchased directly from MagCloud.

Printing and framing

Printing and framing

I print and frame exhibition prints in my office at home. Here are two images being prepared for the exhibit at Main Street Arts. A big thanks to Brad for his interest in this project!

Dundee storefront

Dundee storefront, 2017

Ron and I are continuing to work on two offshoots from this project. One is a series of photographs of storefronts,  such as the above second-hand store in Dundee.

Robinson's Wood Shop, Cortland

Robinson’s Wood Shop, Cortland, 2017

Another is a series about upstate New York people and their stories, such as this environmental portrait of Steve Robinson at his wood mill in Cortland.

Wood Hicks and Bark Peelers

Wood Hicks and Bark Peelers

Ron and I have collaborated on a number of books about historical photographers, the most recent of which is Wood Hicks and Bark Peelers: The Photographic Legacy of William T. Clarke, published by Penn State University Press in fall 2016. For more about this project see the New York Times Lens Blog.


See 12 of Harry Littell’s photographs in Unknown, Overlooked, and Unfamiliar at Main Street Arts on display through Friday, March 30, 2018. The exhibition can also be viewed on the gallery’s Artsy page: Artsy.net/mainstreetarts.

From The Director: Art From a Dream State

Similar to the four artists included in this exhibition, I also make artwork that floats in the realm of dreams and a questioning of reality. Many of the exhibitions that we have here (selfishly) relate to my own studio practice or ideas that I am personally interested in and it is because I find these things so interesting that I choose to share them with you through our exhibition programming.

Installation shot from Dream State (pictured: "Isle of Wight" by Lin Price and "The Dream" by Carrianne Hendrickson)

Installation shot from the exhibition (pictured: “Isle of Wight” by Lin Price and “The Dream” by Carrianne Hendrickson)

The notion of the dream state is a never ending source of inspiration and it can be both the object and the subject of an artwork. We rarely give ourselves the opportunity to let our dreams inform our waking life but much can be gained by doing so. Our subconscious mind is often holding the answers to questions that we have been asking ourselves. It is able to offer a glimpse into a personal truth or a hint at finding some kind of greater understanding. The goal in engaging with your dreams, at least for me, is to build a stronger connection between the conscious mind and the subconscious mind. The closer in proximity these two can be, the closer we are to realizing the benefits of dreaming.

Dream State, installation shot

“Dream State”, installation shot

The idea for this exhibition came after a studio visit with Lin Price in Ithaca. I was drawn in to her work when I first saw it in a solo exhibition at Axom Gallery two years ago. When I was talking to her about the prospect of being in an exhibition, I began to think about the sculptures of Carrianne Hendrickson—we had recently begun showing several of Carrianne’s figurative pieces in our gallery shop. Lin had one painting in particular that reminded me of a specific piece I had seen by Carrianne. It was one of the paintings shown in the exhibition at Axom Gallery.

These two pieces in particular (one of Lin’s and one of Carrianne’s) are the reason this show came together. Left: She Only Flies at Nite by Lin Price / Right: Sculptural teapot by Carrianne Hendrickson

While they are not included in the exhibition, these two pieces in particular are the reason this show came together. Left: She Only Flies at Nite by Lin Price / Right: Sculptural teapot by Carrianne Hendrickson

The moment I realized that these two artists in particular belonged in a show together was like a revelation. Two people who probably wouldn’t be in an exhibition together but desperately needed to be! One working in oil paint the other in clay, yet both traveling along the same cerebral path.

From my studio visit with Lin Price in Ithaca, NY

From my studio visit with Lin Price in Ithaca, NY

Lin’s work was a perfect fit for an exhibition called “Dream State”. Her paintings often feature a human figure engaging in some sort of mysterious activity in a nondescript environment. The colorful fields and atmospheres lend themselves to the notion of a dream or at least to a time and place that may not actually exist. Other of her paintings that do not include a figure still somehow evoke that same feeling. A feeling that something might happen or is happening just around the corner, out of frame and out of sight.

Sculptural vessels by Carrianne Hendrickson in the Dream State exhibition

Sculptural vessels by Carrianne Hendrickson in the Dream State exhibition

Carrianne’s sculptures are often layered in symbolism. Sometimes referencing known stories, other times referencing the inner world of the artist herself. To me, they often seem to suggest the moment of realization that things are not quite right. The idea that perhaps, I am sleeping and the world I am currently experiencing is in fact a dream. Examples from pieces in the exhibition include: blank stares from eyes whose head is balancing a bird’s nest, the closed eyes of a dreamer covered in snakes on a yellow striped couch, and the existence of goblins or human/animal hybrids.

Once Lin and Carrianne were secured for inclusion, I then set my sights on finding other artists to bring in to the exhibition and make it more comprehensive.

Left: From my studio visit with Matt Duquette in Buffalo, NY; Right: "The Space In Between" by Matt Duquette

Left: From my studio visit with Matt Duquette in Buffalo, NY; Right: “The Space In Between” by Matt Duquette

I was drawn in by his paintings of chickens. They have an otherworldly feeling to them but are still so relatable because of their subject matter. The paintings of Matt Duquette are often based on dreams and at least one painting in this exhibition was based on a guided meditation session.  Each of the paintings in the exhibition have the same cool, dark color palette. The atmospheric quality of these paintings presents us with situations and we have no idea how we got there. For the most part, there is no other point of reference, just a blue/black void and a light source to accompany the owls and human figures. I get the feeling that these scenes or visions are plucked right from a dream. They tell us something but that “something” is veiled and different for each of us.

Bill Finger's work from the alumni exhibition at RIT

Bill Finger’s work from the alumni exhibition at Rochester Institute of Technology

I saw some of Bill Finger’s photographic triptychs in circular mats at RIT in October of 2016 and was an instant fan. His photographs are a constructed reality running in tandem with the one we live. Whether based on actual places or totally made up, these images have a feeling like trying to recall a dream. You can remember the place and where things were but something seems off. Each of his photographs chosen for this exhibition keep us in an augmented reality where we are unsure what is possible or impossible.

Desert House (Night), a photograph by Bill Finger

Desert House (Night), a photograph by Bill Finger

Imagery that relates to a house or home comes into play throughout this exhibition. Houses, room interiors, nests, these are all familiar images and are all references to places of comfort which are needed to be engaged in sleep. These places become a jumping off point to engage in something that might be unfamiliar or at times, disconcerting. While we have no say in the matter of sleeping, some of us have the ability to recall and consider our dreams. Perhaps not in the way of figuring out the meaning of the dream itself, but to see how the dream may relate to things transpiring in our everyday lives. My hope is that this exhibition can serve as a reminder of how important it is to dream and that we all might begin to look inward in an effort to gain a greater understanding of who we are and how we relate to the world. I know it has for me.


See Dream State at Main Street Arts through this Friday, February 16, 2018. You can also preview some of the work on Artsy: Artsy.net/mainstreetarts.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Lin Price

In Lin's studio with her dog, Cherry

In Lin’s studio with her dog, Cherry

Originally I am from Ann Arbor Michigan, but have spent most of my adult life in New York State, near Ithaca. I had an unconventional and circuitous path toward the arts. After the birth of my second child I decided to return to college and became completely smitten with painting, earning a BFA from Ithaca College and an MFA in painting from Bard College/Milton Avery Graduate School for the Arts. I am drawn to painting because it is a non-verbal language with limitless expressive possibilities.

Isle of Wight, oil on cradled panel, 24" x 18", 2017

Isle of Wight, oil on cradled panel, 24″ x 18″, 2017

Looking at art, especially painting, from all historical eras and styles, gives me new insights and pleasure. Over time, this ‘looking’ is condensing into my own specific vocabulary. My paintings are dream-like and non-linear and explore themes and symbols I believe are universal to most humans; desire, regret, isolation, and joy. Water often plays an important role.

Lover's Knot, oil on cradled panel, 48" x 40", 2017

Lover’s Knot, oil on cradled panel, 48″ x 40″, 2017

The Jetty, oil on cradled panel, 28" x 34", 2017

The Jetty, oil on cradled panel, 28″ x 34″, 2017

I use all kinds of painting media, although lately, oil paint is the medium of choice, which I find challenging and forgiving.

Paint box

Paint box

Lin Price's studio in Danby, NY

Lin Price’s studio in Danby, NY

The landscapes in my work are invented and abstracted, sometimes inhabited by single miniature figures, completely self-contained, creating a sense of aloneness and quiet as they focus on the task at hand. I enjoy surrounding the figures with unusual, unexpected, and mysterious events. The perspective is voyeuristic, one has the sense of peering in at someone’s private obsessions.

Sunrise, oil on canvas, 48" x 60", 2016

Sunrise, oil on canvas, 48″ x 60″, 2016

Fountain Maker, oil on canvas, 44" x 54", 2017

Fountain Maker, oil on canvas, 44″ x 54″, 2017

Margaret, oil on cradled panel, , 21" x 28 1/2", 2017

Margaret, oil on cradled panel, , 21″ x 28 1/2″, 2017

Corona, oil on canvas, 42" x 50", 2017

Corona, oil on canvas, 42″ x 50″, 2017

The paintings evolve with experience and accident, creating areas of texture and intimacy of touch, building a psychology into each environment. This is a challenging and fluid experience. One has to pay close attention when a painting starts to speak.

More of my work can be found at linprice.com


Six of Lin Price’s paintings can be seen in Dream State, on display through February 16, 2018. The exhibition also features photographs by Bill Finger (Seattle, WA), sculpture by Carrianne Hendrickson (Rochester, NY), and paintings by Matt Duquette (Buffalo, NY). Work from the exhibition can be previewed and purchased online. 

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Matt Duquette

Matt Duquette

Matt Duquette

Being a 40-year-old commercial artist and graphic designer, gallery work has always been an idea in the back of my mind. I haven’t dedicated much effort to painting and showing because most of my creative energies are spent in the day-to-day of a design and illustration studio in Buffalo, NY. The gallery seems to be an allusive place where I’m required to be extroverted and share my thoughts and experiences. It does, however, offer an opportunity to create something purely for my own, with materials that allow for exploration.

While in school at RIT, I began to develop a loose, painterly style because I liked to convey action or even emotion of the moment. I was leaning more towards candid portraiture since most of my interests laid in music and sports. In 2000 I attended The School of Visual Art (SVA) in New York City to further develop my visual storytelling. Here, I began to include collaged elements—paper, photos, notes—to help explain the storyline and add visual texture.

Mixed media work from early 2000's

Mixed media work from early 2000′s

Many of my older paintings focused on personal life experiences or at least followed a surreal storytelling approach and almost always involved a figure. I was exploring concepts of home and family, along with the stresses of caring for an ill parent.

Matt Duquette

Figurative work “A New Day” & “Homesick”

A few years ago, after taking some time off from painting, I began drawing the chickens we raising on our small farm. It started merely as an exercise in making art, but I rather enjoyed it because there wasn’t much thought involved. I just drew pictures that I wanted to draw. That experiment has since sparked a number of paintings and drawings, and a new excitement which has allowed me to focus on style. I also get to talk about my chickens.

Matt Duquette

Chicken portraits

The series I worked on for the Dream State show a came at a time when my wife had just experienced a guided meditation dream involving an owl. Even before the show I knew that I wanted to do some type of bird interaction so it was perfect timing. Owl dreams have so many interpretations, but I did the best I could to remain close to her experience. The focus, of course, was the majestic owl guide in a outer space-like atmosphere.

Matt Duquette

Process detail

I’m most comfortable with acrylic paint because it’s fast drying, easy to control, and easy to clean up. It works well with collaged elements and layering of drawings. I typically work with washes of color to build the forms but quickly move to a dry brush technique to layer on the paint. I like to mix the color on the surface, so many times I’ll just use paint straight from the tube. For sometime I’ve used basically the same 6 colors: black, raw umber, burnt sienna, yellow ochre, pthalo blue, and gesso as my white. I only have 3–4 brushes that I’m comfortable using so I try to make it work with what little I have. Again, I would not classify myself as a fine artist.

Matt Duquette

Materials used for painting

You can view more of my personal artwork at mattduquette.com or follow my art and farming adventures on the Instagrams @matt12grain. Thanks for looking!


Five paintings by Matt Duquette can be seen in Dream State, on display through February 16, 2018. The exhibition also features photographs by Bill Finger (Seattle, WA), sculpture by Carrianne Hendrickson (Rochester, NY), and paintings by Lin Price (Ithaca, NY). Work from the exhibition can be previewed and purchased online. 

Meet the Artist in Residence: Kelly Clare

Kelly Clare, artist in residence at Main Street Arts, during the months of January and February 2018, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Kelly some questions about her work and studio practice:

Kelly Clare

Kelly Clare

Q: Tell us about your background
Right now I live in Benzie County, the smallest county in Michigan. It has only one full stoplight. Midwinter, there’s a frozen turkey bowling tournament on the ice, right out on the lake. I studied both creative writing and art at Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois, where there is also a lot of ice, but more stoplights, and an incredibly generous group of faculty and students. I spent the last year there as a Post Baccalaureate Fellow managing a letterpress shop.

tork, woodblock, 2 x 3, 2017

tork, woodblock, 2 x 3, 2017

Q: How would you describe your work?
Most of my work pursues a longer predicament. In thinking about language, for example, I often struggle with its collective nature—how can I use “carpet” when senators are suggesting “carpet bombing”; what do I do when the thing I love is used in both impossibly kind and impossibly cruel ways, and what is my responsibility as a participant in this human project.

from RAW DREADFUL CRAZE, 2016, an installation. Each word of a speech given by then potential Republican nominee Ted Cruz was affixed to a pin. Over the course of a few days, participants were asked to reorder words, allowed to reinstall and possibly salvage the language anywhere they’d like.

from RAW DREADFUL CRAZE, 2016, an installation. Each word of a speech given by then potential Republican nominee Ted Cruz was affixed to a pin. Over the course of a few days, participants were asked to reorder words, allowed to reinstall and possibly salvage the language anywhere they’d like.

08_Clare

At the same time, words have a physical, tangible echo to them when they’re spoken, drawn, molded out of lead, poured out in pancake batter. We absorb their vibrations, eat them as crackers, rearrange them so please gets to be elapse and asleep. There’s something playful there, but also almost holy. A pile of pretzels gets to be wheat and salt—miraculously harvested, ground up, cooked in giant ovens, packaged and shipped worldwide—but at the same time spells out I was and I was / whirling feathers, either bird — / Every hunger / is first century, lines from “Keats is Coughing” by Marianne Boruch. The shape gets to be two things, many things, at once.

Thank you, Grace Paley, installation, 2017

Thank you, Grace Paley, installation, 2017

To my mind, a lot of my work is built on a sort of serious play. Often, even when I’m not thinking about language, about the anagram, I’m invoking that sort of endless possible undo and redo in whatever medium I’m holding onto—printmaking, the essay, installations, sculpture, fibers, drawing, the poem. And I think, as an artist, I’m still getting my legs. I hope to spend most of my life getting my hands dirty like this.

here’s to you, charlotte the sky, 2017

here’s to you, charlotte the sky, 2017

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
I don’t know if I have a single, stable process. I show up, I think, mostly, or I try to. Some of my work functions in response to some long, articulable thought, something I can point to and say this anchorable fact is what I’ve been circling around all this time. Some of my work, especially more recent sculptures and drawings, come from impulse. Which isn’t to say they’re not deeply grounded in experience and gathered thought, but they’re much harder to talk about. I can tell you what paint, what sweater, what piece of wood, where the dirt came from, and I could sit with you for a very long time sorting through what the piece is doing successfully or unsuccessfully. I think there is more than one way to cross a river, and sometimes you’re tunneling underneath.

you wouldn't stop glowing, 2017

you wouldn’t stop glowing, 2017

Q: Who are your favorite artists and why?
The list is very long, and includes just as many writers as artists. Mary Ruefle, Eula Biss, and Marilynne Robinson have all been essential in shaping how I think of the world—there’s this thoroughness, integrity, and sometimes delight there in those essays and novels. And I have loved too many poets to name. Ralph Angel, Marianne Boruch, Heather Christle, Carl Phillips. James Tate. C.D. Wright. I feel like I’m writing a thank you note and forgetting everyone. I mean, I wouldn’t be myself without a whole summer of just reading Carole Maso. Or the time I’ve spent listening to Lorrie Moore, Don Delilo, Grace Paley. Not to mention my incredible friends and the faculty I’ve worked with.

straggler, 2016

straggler, 2016

It’s the same with artists. I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about Jen Bervin and Ann Hamilton’s respective bodies of work, their longer thoughts. I love Nina Katchadourian, Sarah Sze, Jessica Stockholder. I love Pedro Reyes piece, Palas por Pistolas, which I think is a brilliant instance of material transformation. The Fluxus movement and Rirkrit Tiravanija’s pad thai. Doris Salcedo, and Cathy Park Hong’s essay responding to her retrospective.

Everyone I gravitate towards thinks along different lines, but throughout there’s a longer, insistent pressure in their work, even when it’s incredibly playful. And I often think of them speaking to each other, across discipline, time, distance, movement. If you asked, I would draw you a little map.

The Work Is / The New York Times, 2015. Print project encompassing the entirety of one copy of the October 11, 2015 edition of the New York Times. After blackout poems were made from the news articles, the newspaper itself was shredded and remade into over 90 small booklets. Each booklet was printed with the blackout poems.

The Work Is / The New York Times, 2015. Print project encompassing the entirety of one copy of the October 11, 2015 edition of the New York Times. After blackout poems were made from the news articles, the newspaper itself was shredded and remade into over 90 small booklets. Each booklet was printed with the blackout poems.

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
I have a few threads I’ve been working on lately, playing with tactility and language, and I hope to stage an installation or two. I would like to continue my reading, drawing, and writing practices, but more than anything else I’m going to try to give myself permission to throw my efforts into serious play, into following the idea, the object, wherever it takes me. To listen in, and hard.

sprint / spring, 2017

sprint / spring, 2017

Q: What’s next for you?
After another summer in Northern Michigan, I hope to settle into an MFA program, fingers crossed.

 Q: Where else can we find you?
kellyclare.weebly.com


Kelly is leading two workshops during her residency at Main Street Arts: paper marbling on Saturday, January 20  and Japanese stab binding on Saturday, February 17. Sign up through the online gallery shop

Meet the Artist in Residence: Jane Waggoner Deschner 

Jane Waggoner Deschner, artist in residence at Main Street Arts, during the month of January 2018, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Jane some questions about her work and studio practice:

Jane Waggoner Deschner

Q: Tell us about your background.
I grew up in Lawrence, Kansas, and moved to Montana 40 years ago. At the University of Kansas I studied urban geography (the only spatially-based social science). All my life I’d made things but being an artist scared me. After a few years in Montana I enrolled in an art class at the university. Over the next 7 years and through a divorce, I earned a second BA, this time in art. Photomontage emerged as my medium. In 2000 I decided I wanted to make “better” art so applied to and was accepted at Vermont College of Fine Arts, a low residency MFA program. Though it was a challenge to get from one obscure location to another twice a year, it was the perfect program for me. I earned my MFA in 2002 and my medium became the vernacular photograph.

Q: How would you describe your work?
When vernacular photographs became my medium at the end of grad school, I made large archival photo prints from scanned snapshots (anonymous family photographs) manipulated in Photoshop.

"from the underneath series (beach, sailboat)" 2007, 17 x 28 inches, archival print

“from the underneath series (beach, sailboat)”
2007, 17 x 28 inches, archival print

In 2007, fatigued by hours at the keyboard, I began hand-embroidering quotes into studio portraits. Adding famous persons’ words to vernacular images, I could ventriloquize thoughts my aging, maternal (increasingly opinionated) self wanted to express.

"from the maxim series (Wayne, pony, girl)" 2007, 7 x 5 inches, hand-embroidered found photograph collection of Marcie Rae McDade

“from the maxim series (Wayne, pony, girl)”
2007, 7 x 5 inches, hand-embroidered found photograph
collection of Marcie Rae McDade

Later I also added illustrative drawings and collaged images to my work.

"from the symbol series (Superman, goofy boy)" 2009, 11 x 12 inches, hand-embroidered found photographs

“from the symbol series (Superman, goofy boy)”
2009, 11 x 12 inches, hand-embroidered found photographs

"from the resilience series (Horne, I'm me)" 2011, 17 x 23 inches, hand-embroidered found photographs

“from the resilience series (Horne, I’m me)”
2011, 17 x 23 inches, hand-embroidered found photographs
collection of Tom Jones

Stitching by hand is a laborious, time-consuming process that provides me a satisfying, meditative intimacy with these mechanically-captured moments of unknown people’s lives.

"from the maxim series (Leger, beautiful)" front & back views 2011, 10 x 8 inches, hand-embroidered found studio portrait

“from the maxim series (Leger, beautiful)”
front & back views
2011, 10 x 8 inches, hand-embroidered found studio portrait

"from the vanitas series (Madonna)" 2016, 18 x 25 inches, hand-embroidered found photographs

“from the vanitas series (Madonna)”
2016, 18 x 25 inches, hand-embroidered found photographs, glass beads and holy cards

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
I’ve amassed an archive of ±65,000 vernacular photos, mostly snapshots and studio portraits, but some news photos and movie promo shots. I collect quotes from famous and ordinary people. I start with either a photo I’m attracted to or a quotation (or image) that resonates with me, then find its counterpart. I scan the photo then typeset the words or make a drawing in Photoshop. I tape the printed pattern over the photo; then poke holes that I later stitch through. 

Q: Do you have a job other than making art? 
I have lots of jobs and all are art-related. I also work as an exhibition installer, graphic designer, photographer, instructor, curator and picture framer.

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
WHAT: Since fall 2015 the primary thing I’ve been working on is a combinatorial project, “Remember me: a collective narrative in found words and photographs.”  “Remember me” integrates vernacular photographs with statements culled from family/friend-written obituaries.

To date, I’ve completed over #350 separate anecdotal pieces,

"Remember me: a collective narrative in found words and photogrphs" 2015–2017, sampling of pieces

“Remember me: a collective narrative in found words and photogrphs”
2015–2017, sampling of anecdotal pieces

a dozen group “motto” pieces,

"Remember me: motto (Golden Rule, Mike, Isabel, Jose, Ruth)" 2017, 14 x 20 inches, hand-embroidered Muralcraft Studios proofs

“Remember me: motto (Golden Rule, Mike, Isabel, Jose, Ruth)”
2017, 14 x 20 inches, hand-embroidered Muralcraft Studios proofs

and an “avid” diptych.

"Remember me (avid)" diptych 2017, each piece 25 x 31 inches, hand-embroidered studio proofs

“Remember me (avid)” diptych
2017, each piece 25 x 31 inches, hand-embroidered studio proofs

"Remember me (avid)" detail

“Remember me (avid)” detail

I’m currently working on a new piece to add to my “garment series,” an adult-size bowling shirt of stitched together snapshots that will be embroidered with #300 nicknames.

"from the garment series (t-shirt, school kids)" 2012, 19 x 22 x 2 inches, hand-embroidered found school portraits

“from the garment series (t-shirt, school kids)”
2012, 19 x 25 x 2 inches, hand-embroidered found school portraits

WHY: Obituaries and vernacular photographs have much in common. Both synopsize universal human experiences — loving, living, making and keeping memories ­— and were created for personal use. While each is unique, they are generic as virtually everyone has the same life goals, aspirations, accomplishments, hopes, dreams, desires.  Hand-embroidering text into photos intimately merges the two. The photos “read” the texts and vice versa, teasing pretension, tragi-comedy and profound truths about the human condition from sentimental artifacts.

"Remember me (JMT [MA])" 2017, 9 x 7 inches, hand-embroidered found studio portrait

“Remember me (JMT [MA])”
2017, 9 x 7 inches, hand-embroidered found studio portrait
“She was a woman who had seen 98 years of changes, but a woman becoming President was the one change she realized she would never be able to witness.”

This project, ultimately, intimately, illustrates our collective narrative. And in so doing, importantly reminds us, in this acrimonious age, of our commonalities. 

GOAL: To continue exploring the possibilities—following the tangents—I keep discovering as I expand this project (which continues to bring me joy everyday). 

Q: Who inspires you and why?
I’m continually inspired (and heartened) by the anonymous people I see in the photos I’ve collected and whose anecdotes I’ve found in obituaries.

Q: What type of music do you listen to? How does music affect your artwork?
I don’t listen to music when I work. When I made photomontages, I would distract my conscious mind by listening to TV soap operas (“General Hospital” and “One Life to Live”). These days while I poke holes or stitch, I find serial shows to stream. Having ongoing characters and story lines allows me to follow the “action” by only occasionally looking up at the screen. Also I’m still in the story when my mind wanders. I’m down to the last three episodes of “Prisoner in Cell Block H,” a 692-episode Australian soap opera from the early 1980s that takes place in a women’s prison. It’s wonderful!

H

Q: What was your experience like at art school?
Grad school changed my art life. The Montana city I live in just recently exceeded 100,000 inhabitants and continues to be the largest city for 500 miles in any direction. For art and culture, it’s an isolating place to be from. VCFA is a low-residency, self-directed program in which both the faculty and the students come from across the US twice a year for an intense week. My horizons expanded, both personally and professionally. I learned to think more critically and, as a result, came out making better art. The ways I was taught to think and learn continue to serve me well. “Remember me” in many ways circles back to the combinatorial collaborative project I did as my senior thesis exhibit, “The Anchor Project.”

Q: Do you collect anything?
My most extensive collection is found photographs. They sit around my studio in ±100 6 qt. plastic storage boxes; ±50 3” looseleaf notebooks; 34 4” x 6” photo albums; and various stacks, piles and boxes. Every day I write anecdotes I find in obits on 3 x 5 inch index cards. I now have some great ones from all 50 US states and most Canadian provinces.

I also collect found pencils, poultry wishbones, Dia de los Muertos artifacts, desiccant packets, run-over bottle caps, pressed souvenir pennies, McDonald’s collectable glass mugs (Batman Forever and Flintstones) and have a growing number of my own artworks in the storage closet.

Dia

Dia de los Muertos collection

Q: What is the most useful tool in your studio?
My two pairs of eyeglasses (trifocals and computer glasses). But I couldn’t make art without my 27” iMac, photo scanner, laser printer, Scotch Magic tape and homemade hole poker.

Q: What advice would you give to other artists?
The best advice I ever received was midway through grad school when one of my advisors said, “When you know why you choose the images you choose, you can choose more and better.”

Q: What’s next for you?
“Remember me” will be the centerpiece in a solo exhibition of my work with found photos at the University of Michigan–Dearborn in 2018. I’m exploring book possibilities and looking for other exhibition opportunities.

Q: Where else can we find you?
www.janedeschner.com www.facebook.com/jane.deschner www.facebook.com/janewaggonerdeschner/ www.instagram.com/janedeschner1/