Tag Archives: Painter

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Jim DeLucia

I have always been creative as far back as I can remember. It wasn’t until I went to college that I began to paint. I mean really paint. I earned my BFA in 2002 and didn’t officially become a full-time artist until 2013.  Soon after, I shifted into the role of stay-at-home dad and nighttime painter. And here we are.

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My current studio set up, my basement.

These are my favorite brush sizes and palette knife shape.

These are my favorite brush sizes and palette knife shape.

My painting Salt Life is a loose representation based off a photo from a mini vacation to Florida. I was visiting a friend who moved there from Rochester. He would always say “It’s the salt life, Jim.” I don’t really venture out into water, but there is something about the ocean that just gets me. Always changing. That’s attractive to me.

Salt Life, Oil on paper.

Salt Life, Oil on paper.

All my work is oil paint and graphite on canvas or paper. My style and subject matter has seemed to change over the years but the materials have remained. Landscapes , dogs, patterns and pink are the usual suspects in my work. I’m kind of all over the place.

Stella, Oil and colored pencil on canvas. Current pet portrait work in progress.

Stella, Oil and colored pencil on canvas. Current pet portrait work in progress.

I am currently painting pet portraits, figuring out Adobe Illustrator, and trying to finish a children’s book influenced by my daughter’s pink boots.

Pink Boots #14, graphite and colored pencil on paper. A page from children's book project.

Pink Boots #14, graphite and colored pencil on paper. A page from children’s book project.

You can see more of my work at  www.jimdelucia.com or @jimdelucia on Instagram.


Jim DeLucia is one of 28 artists featured in “Land & Sea”, a national juried exhibition of landscapes and seascapes juried by Deirdre Aureden, director of programs and special projects at the Schweinfurth Art Center in Auburn, NY. The exhibition runs through June 29, 2018.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Ruth LaGue

I grew up in Alaska, awed by the incredible vastness of the wild landscape. Gazing at the expansive skies and majestic mountains as a girl, I recognized that I was a small part of something much larger than myself.

"Migration" by Ruth LaGue, Best In Show winner in Land and Sea at Main Street Arts.

“Migration” by Ruth LaGue, Best In Show winner in Land and Sea at Main Street Arts.

Traveling through India in my twenties, I became consumed by the landscape of the spirit — that limitless interior universe that lives in each of us. The marriage of the two experiences ignited a lifelong quest to connect the outer and inner within my paintings.

To me, landscapes represent fragments of time that will never be again; intimate moments of communion with something greater than myself; quiet meditations to which I bear witness.

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Work by Ruth LaGue

The most exciting part of the creative process is observing the juxtaposition of colors and textures as they form a depth of field — how a simple dark line next to a light field of color can come alive.

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Ruth in her studio

I use palette knives, mixing colors on the surface of the canvas and using visual economy in my work, reducing the landscape to its barest form.

I rarely come to the studio with an idea of what I’m going to paint but rather listen for the inspiration from within.

I always wanted to go to art school. I applied and was accepted to the Rhode Island School of Design to study graphic design; after graduation I began a career as a graphic designer and later as a web designer. Ten years ago, I found a studio space at the Gorse Mill Studios in Needham, MA and began painting. I’m grateful I’ve had the opportunity to explore two very different aspects of my professional life.

I can be found online at www.laguewax.com, on Instagram: @ruthlague and on Facebook: @Laguewax


Ruth LaGue is one of 28 artists featured in “Land & Sea”, a national juried exhibition of landscapes and seascapes juried by Deirdre Aureden, director of programs and special projects at the Schweinfurth Art Center in Auburn, NY. Ruth’s painting “Migration” won Best In Show. The exhibition runs through June 29, 2018.

Meet the Artist in Residence: Dain Q. Gore

Dain Gore, artist in residence during the month of June 2018 at Main Street Arts, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Dain some questions about his work and studio practice:

Artist Dain Q. Gore

Artist Dain Q. Gore

Q: Tell us about your background.
I was born in Phoenix and live in Laveen, AZ. I have been there my whole life. I keep thinking what it would be like to move but in my travels I have yet to find a Goldilocks Zone for that (except maybe Japan). I have an MFA in painting (2009) and BFA in drawing (2000) from ASU. When I’m not making art for upcoming shows I like to perform puppetry at the Great Arizona Puppet Theater in the Puppet Slams.

Q: How long have you been making artwork?
I was just telling a friend that the only good days I really remember about grade school were when I could draw, especially when it was “rainy day schedule.” As a small kid, there really was nothing much else of significance for me than drawing and collecting action figures and video games. Socialization came much later in life.

"Histrionics of Medicine" by Dain Q. Gore

“Histrionics of Medicine” by Dain Q. Gore

Q: What was your experience like at art school?
I’ve also been talking about this a lot lately. My perspective now has been oddened, as peers are relating experiences that I simply did not have. For some reason I feel like I had some kind of plot armor, or that as I recall it, knew I could accept or reject anything tasked of me. This was best illustrated when a professor gave me a long list of corrections to my painting, followed by, “Or not…just keep painting!” This became a running joke at critiques but stuck from then on. This probably made the most sense of anything I ever learned in art school. Any kind of actual learning—not mimicking, not repeating–I think involves a moment where you simply have to do and stop thinking.

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“Tardinaut” by Dain Q. Gore

Q: Do you have a job other than making art?
I do! I am currently a faculty adjunct at South Mountain Community and Phoenix College. In addition, I have been substituting at Metro Arts, an arts-based high school in Phoenix. I’ve also been starting to do workshops based on some of my specific niche areas of interest in art, such at the Exquisite Corpse  and painting board gaming miniatures. I also perform puppetry, as mentioned above, which often intervenes into my exhibitions.

"Exquisite Corpse" by Dain Q. Gore

“Exquisite Corpse” pieces by Dain Q. Gore

Q: How would you describe your work?
My work is colorful, experimental, playful, image-ridden and fragile.

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
My process very often involves turning on some music (I like art/prog rock) or Coast to Coast AM or an audiobook (currently trying to finish Snow Crash) to get started. I get out a piece of foam core and draw out a basic shape using a white China marker, paint directly onto the surface (sometimes with gesso or medium first).

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
My goals were initially to experiment further, but now I have a list of several things I would like to play with that may still involve my process.

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“Art Clocky” by Dain Q. Gore

Q: Who is your favorite artist and why?
I have so many too pick just one: James Ensor, Philip Guston, Martin Wong, Wayne White. There are so many great ones on Instagram now, too. I would have to say James Ensor overall, though, because his life echoes his art so closely in such a surreal way and feels like an echo of my life and art, too.

Q: What type of music do you listen to?
As mentioned, music can be crucial to getting me out of my own head and on to painting surfaces. I love DEVO, Blue Oyster Cult, Oingo Boingo, Idiot Flesh (and its numerous incarnations), Father John Misty, Of Montreal, Talking Heads, Neon Indian, Stereolab, Adam and the Ants, Al Stewart…

"Avatar of Kek" by Dain Q. Gore

“Avatar of Kek” by Dain Q. Gore

Q: Do you collect anything?
I “used to” collect action figures. I have a hopeless fascination with them, and it certainly has influenced my aesthetic choices and being a puppeteer. I also collect (and sometimes actually paint) the aforementioned miniatures.

Q: What’s next for you?
As soon as I get back to AZ I have to start working on a Puppet Slam piece for GenCon, two shows I will be featured in at Eric Fischl Gallery in September and Fine Arts Complex in October, in addition to the monthly AZ Puppet Slams!

Q: Where else can we find you?
I can be found on Instagram @daintist and at www.daingore.com


Dain will be teaching two workshops during his residency at Main Street Arts. The first will take place on Saturday, June 16 from 12 to 3 pm and will focus on the Surrealist game of Exquisite Corpse—a spontaneous, group-collaborated creature where the only limit is your own imagination (see image above). Perfect for a group of friends! Sign up here.

The second workshop, taking place on Saturday, June 23 from 12 to 3 pm, will give participants to create puppet-like paintings that Dain calls “INGs”. Somewhere between two-dimensional paintings and sculptures, these objects represent an element of play as well as a thoughtful approach to the layered sensibility of painting (see images above). Sign up here.

 

"Bad Seed" by Chad Grohman

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Chad Grohman

Landscape by Chad Grohman

Landscape painting by Chad Grohman

I am from Buffalo, NY and have spent all but one year of my life there, minus the four years of undergrad at Rochester Institute of Technology. I didn’t really live in Rochester so much as the college itself, so I don’t really count that. My MFA was in a distance program so I stayed in Buffalo.

That being said, I have shown mostly in Rochester and other other cities besides Buffalo. As a commercial illustrator, I draw or paint many subjects in many media. When my personal artwork is shown in galleries, I tend to mostly paint landscapes. I paint landscapes because the landscape is where I prefer to be; outside. That’s the great thing about being an illustrator —as a freelancer, I can use what ever minutes I choose to be outside. While there walking or sitting, I began to draw and paint from life, as well as in the studio from photos. It was not until about 2010 that I really began painting landscapes.

Landscape by Chad Grohman

Landscape by Chad Grohman

Many years ago I began practicing and studying Buddhism. Outdoors is a wonderful place to practice. The school I belong to has a beautiful liturgy that is well suited for outdoors. Holding an outdoor service for the land and painting the land is an amazing combination.

School Days by Chad Grohman

“School Days” featured in the CULTIVATE exhibition at Main Street Arts

I am a Nichiren Shu novice Buddhist priest. In the CULTIVATE exhibition, I am showing artwork inspired by recent training trips to Japan — both rural and urban. The cats included in many of the pieces represent all realms of existence, primarily the bodhisattva (concern for others), human, animal, hell realms. The cats are spiritual — they suffer, they are beneficial, and are often confused.

"Original Disciples" by Chad Grohman

“Original Disciples” by Chad Grohman, included in the CULTIVATE exhibition

The artwork is mounted on cardboard. I prefer the basic nature of using cardboard and watercolor paper. I have long been attracted to and inspired by hobo art and the limited materials they use.

"Bad Seed" by Chad Grohman

“Bad Seed” by Chad Grohman, included in the CULTIVATE exhibtion


Chad Grohman is one of eight gallery artists represented by Main Street Arts. He is featured in the exhibition CULTIVATE which runs April 7 through May 18, 2018. More information about Chad and his work can be found on our website. View more pieces by Chad Grohman on the gallery’s Artsy page.

 

Meet the Artist in Residence: Marisa Bruno

Marisa Bruno is our first artist in residence at Main Street Arts! She’ll be working in one of our two studio spaces from May through June 2016 (you can stop by the gallery to see Marisa’s studio and work in progress). We asked Marisa a few questions about her artwork, life, and more:

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Q: To start this off, would you tell us about your background? 

A: I live in Rochester, NY and began making artwork seriously towards the end of high school. I attended SUNY Fredonia, studied art intensely there for four years and graduated with my BFA in Drawing and Painting in 2015. Now that I am back home, I work at part time at Donna Marie’s Gluten Free Bakery. Surprisingly, working at a bakery provides many creative outlets like cake decorating and allows me to meet new and interesting people every day. I paint personal and commissioned work for galleries and individual patrons.

Q: How would you describe your work? 

A: Currently I work in oil paint on surfaces like Masonite or wood paneling. I focus primarily on the human form; expressions, body language, the way light interacts with the face, the way gestures can relate moods and ideas all catch my attention. I use expressive brushwork and intense colors in my work.

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?

A: It always begins with sketching. So much sketching in combination with journalling and  taking more photos than I could ever use. Then I sort through the images and words to form the painting. My mental image of what the painting will look like often changes drastically during this step. Once I’ve selected a photo reference to work from (or two or three), I prepare a wood panel with gesso or liquin, sketch the image (with much revision) and then begin painting. I like to walk away from my works in progress and come back later for another painting session. It helps me to see areas needing improvement.

Q: What are your goals for this residency? Tell us about your current projects.

A: I’d say I have three main goals: Paint as much as possible, meet as many people as possible and learn new skills from my environment and the people around me!

I am currently working on a series called Wrapping Paper, focusing on the acceptance and beauty of physical imperfections despite the pressures of society. The first painting in this series can be viewed on my website here .

In addition, I am planning an exhibition for the second floor of Main Street Arts. This show is in its early stages but updates will be coming soon! I’m also putting together a Figure Drawing workshop to take place in June. Look for more updates in the next week!

Q: What’s next for you?

A: I am planning on continuing to show work in galleries, work at the bakery and hopefully enroll in grad school in the coming year. I am also working for the Arts at the Gardens fine art show. You can find out more about it here.

Q: Where can we find you?

A: My work can be viewed on my website, Facebook and Instagram! I also had the great honor of being included in the first edition of Art House Press Magazine.


Are you an artist looking for new opportunities? Apply for a residency at Main Street Arts! Artists in residence will have 24-hour access to a large studio on our second floor (with great natural light), the option to show work in the gallery, and the opportunity to teach paid workshops. Submissions are reviewed and awarded on an ongoing basis.

Inside The Artist’s Studio with Emily Glass

I spent my childhood outside in rural Vermont, taking care of animals and watching wildlife grow. As a kid I photographed my surrounding world extensively, always documenting, always looking. I loved art classes in high school and first worked with oil paint at the State University of New York Potsdam in 2004.  I found the challenge of oil exciting and completely engrossing.

24 by 42.5 inches, Oil on Canvas, 2015

I Discard (in progress during the residency), 24 by 42.5 inches, Oil on Canvas, 2015

I think of my work as a mix of abstraction and realism.  With it, I seek to communicate subtle narrative and commentary on our current culture. I am beginning a shift into using more plant-based imagery and questioning what it means to have a particular plant on a dinner table or in a yard.  The privileges and beliefs that come with iceberg lettuce versus arugula (or dandelion leaves versus cabbage) reveal differences in class systems and political associations.

My residency studio at the Vermont Studio Center

My studio at the Vermont Studio Center

In the Flora and Fauna exhibition, four paintings were started at a residency at Vermont Studio Center (VSC) in June 2015.

Here is an excerpt from my time there:

While parts of the country were fighting drought, the Vermont sky opened up with rain.  I would keep the windows open, breath in the wet air and paint for hours.  When the rain broke (about every two days or so), I was exhausted from painting and needed to think before beginning again. During those breaks in the rain I spent my time walking, writing and reading outside, documenting what caught my eye and turning over thoughts. Everything was so green, so rich.

Studio Workbench

Studio Workbench

It was summer but the rainy days were cold. I wore a fleece hat and kept an extra pair of dry socks in my studio for the next rainfall painting session.

I have only mentioned my working habits at the residency, which was one half of the experience.  The other half were the 45 or so wonderful visual artists and writers that were also residing at VSC and whom I shared my meals with.  The experience is one I recommend to anyone looking for a nourishing and intensive space to develop work.

My Agent Says the Neighbors are Nice, Oil Paint on Canvas, 43 by 180 inches, 2014

My Agent Says the Neighbors are Nice, Oil Paint on Canvas, 43 by 180 inches, 2014

During the year I teach painting and drawing at Rochester Institute of Technology and spend as much time as possible in my home studio, developing oily canvases and putting together plans for future works.

View Emily’s artwork online at emilyglassart.com. Stop by Main Street Arts to see Emily’s work in our current exhibition, Flora and Fauna. The exhibition is up through Friday, February 12. Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by encaustic painter Kristen T. Woodward.