Tag Archives: Small Works 2017

Inside The Artist’s Studio with Colleen Pendry: What it means to be a Hybrid Artist

For the artist, the process of “making” may appear aloof. We are independent thinkers, and for the most part are reserved. We pride ourselves in our separateness, however, we, or at least I, find great energy in the overall closeness we have with others through the sharing of our work.

Over the past 50 years, my work has taken on many forms. From copying “how to be an artist” matchbook covers when I was kid, to watercolor painting in the early seventies to oils and pastels in the eighties. In those early years my work was primarily seated in a two-dimensional realm, but, I always thought there was something missing. My aesthetic conversation seemed to be stifled…nothing more to say on a flat surface. The pretty pictures were simply that…pretty…lacking content and an extended dialogue.

Little did I know how growing up in the 1960′s, would truly impact my work. As history continued to repeat itself in the art world, I could see the same happening in my own work. The regurgitation of memory and materials, over and over again, began emerging as a relentless new discourse. Multiplicity, multiplicity, multiplicity.

Testimonial IV (2011) mixed media on acrylic panel

Testimonial IV (2011) mixed media on acrylic panel

Testimonial I (2011) mixed media on acrylic panel

Testimonial I (2011) mixed media on acrylic panel

My work made a significant departure from painting throughout the nineties when I began to merge genres and combine disparate materials and techniques. From a metaphorical standpoint this was the perfect path in pushing not only the making process, but  content as well. “There is a story to be told”, my mother always reminded me, and “you just need to find a way to tell it.”

As painting began to be pushed off the wall and then stripped totally from a traditional gallery installation, the dialogue changed, becoming compelling in both form and intent.

If This Wall Could Talk (2012) mixed media and light

If This Wall Could Talk  (2012) mixed media and light

 A Room with a View (2012) mixed media installation

A Room with a View (2012) mixed media installation

If you visit my studio you will find a great deal of stuff as I continue to embrace this new identity. I have found these collections of nothing a relevant source of material in most of my work and an endless reflection of the stuff in my head. This following series of small narratives, which had been brewing for quite some time, emerged from the studio in a most unexpected way.

In this series titled Where Have All the Flowers Gone, my intent was not to reveal any conclusions, but, force an inquisition, and open ended conversation about concepts relating to objectivity, political correctness, preciousness, humility and humanity. Underlying themes are complex and uncomfortable and meaning is uncertain. This particular work can be described as an intellectual layering by way of circumstance. Captured on shelves and in pristine plastic boxes familiar objects appear tangible yet illusive. Juxtaposed with the silhouette, memory becomes a source of meaning, albeit complicated and skewed. This circumstantial evidence, left to its own devices, has the potential to elicit from viewers the unexpected.

Because You're Worth It (2017) Gelatin capsules, silhouette, Barbie, wire, acrylic

Because You’re Worth It (2017)
Gelatin capsules, silhouette, Barbie, wire, acrylic

In a Heartbeat (2017) Shell casings, pedestal, silhouette, American Flag, toy gun,barbed wire, acrylic

In a Heartbeat (2017)
Shell casings, pedestal, silhouette, American Flag, toy gun, barbed wire, acrylic

First Responders (2017) Ashes, silhouette, Bible, Koran, ribbon, acrylic

First Responders (2017)
Ashes, silhouette, Bible, Koran, ribbon, acrylic

See Jane Run (2017) Doll parts, silhouette, Mary Jane shoes, acrylic *Where Have All the Flowers Gone – photography by Jeremy Leadbetter

See Jane Run (2017)
Doll parts, silhouette, Mary Jane shoes, acrylic
*Where Have All the Flowers Gone – photography by Jeremy Leadbetter

From this series came the work currently in the Small Works Exhibition at Main Street Arts.

Nature/Nurture (2017) Cicadidae shell, paper, beeswax, pedestal, silhouette, gold bands, string, acrylic

Nature/Nurture (2017)
Cicadidae shell, paper, beeswax, pedestal, silhouette, gold bands, string, acrylic

Nature/Nurture - detail

Nature/Nurture – detail

Nature:Nurture (2017) Cicadidae shells, handmade paper, crushed wasp next, baling twine, Swarovski crystal, synthetic pearl (collectively)

Nature:Nurture (2017)
Cicadidae shells, handmade paper, crushed wasp next, baling twine, Swarovski crystal, synthetic pearl (collectively)

As an homage to the wondrous images of Robert Mapplethorpe and the eternal debate of nature vs nurture, these works continue. The juxtaposition of form and content seem contradictory…makes sense I think.

Nature:Nurture IV Cicadidae shell, handmade paper, silver thread, silver beads

Nature:Nurture IV (2017)
Cicadidae shell, handmade paper, silver thread, silver beads

Nature:Nurture V (2017) Cicadidae shell, handmade paper, snakeskin

Nature:Nurture V (2017)
Cicadidae shell, handmade paper, snakeskin

Nature:Nurture VI (2017) Cicadidae shell, handmade paper, snake skin head

Nature:Nurture VI (2017)
Cicadidae shell, handmade paper, snake skin head

Thank you to Main Street Arts for the opportunity to share this work. I am truly grateful.

Colleen Pendry


Three of Colleen’s “Nature:Nurture” pieces are currently on display in Main Street Arts’ fourth annual “Small Works” exhibition (juried by Cory E. Card, former curator at View Arts Center in Old Forge, NY). The exhibition runs through January 4, 2018 and can be previewed onlinestore.mainstreetartsgallery.com

 

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Jaime Gaiti

My interest in making art has been prevalent throughout my life. Even as a young child I always enjoyed making small objects, drawings, and collages.  I can even remember one of my elementary school art teachers, very matter of factly, stating that I would be an artist one day.  I was born and raised in Ronkonkoma, New York, a town in the center of Long Island.  After graduating high school, I attended Suffolk County Community College on and off for a few years where I discovered how interested I truly was in pursuing art school.

Gaiti working on her BFA thesis in her studio

Jaime working on her BFA thesis in her studio

When I began my academic career at Suffolk, I was interested in ceramics and by the time I left I had decided to major in sculpture, which led me to apply to the Maine College of Art in Portland, Maine in 2014. By 2016, I had graduated from MECA with my BFA in Sculpture. At MECA I had access to countless new materials and techniques that I used to develop my work including, metal smithing, mold making, welding, and fabrication.

An image of Gaiti's studio at MECA

An image of Jaime’s studio at MECA

My work has always centered around the human body and some of my own intimate, personal experiences and struggles. One of these early pieces, Contact Comfort, was created by using plaster bandages to create casts of my own body that were assembled to abstract the form, as well as chicken wire to create the underlying structure of the piece. I made this piece with the idea of human’s inherent need for physical contact and the need to be loved and cared for. At this point, the inherent fragility of the human body and life became a prevalent theme for my work. Personally, I was experiencing a relationship in which I felt myself separating while feeling like the other person was becoming increasingly dependent.

"Contact Comfort," 2015

“Contact Comfort,” 2015

As I further developed my work, I began to abstract the human form and focus in on the grotesque qualities of the body as I became less interested in portraying the body as solidly as I had in previous work, like Contact Comfort.  I became interested in the simultaneous presence of the grotesque and  beauty in the human body and how I could create forms that were  repulsive, uncomfortable, and familiar. This body of work began with Human, which is included in the Small Works exhibition, and began the development of my thesis project.

Detail of "Human," 2016

Detail of “Human,” 2016

Through this body of work, I aimed to create a sense of discomfort and familiarity for my audience; they are able to make connections to the work by relating it to their own bodies. I began to focus and draw inspiration from my own experiences with life and death, including the death of my mother in 2014. I created this work in an effort to answer questions about the fragility and complexities of life and death by confronting people with the delicate and impermanent nature of their own lives.  I began to explore the effects of being faced with the realization of one’s own mortality, the limitations of flesh, and anxieties about the body’s inevitable decay.

"Bound in Flesh, Time, and Place," 2016

“Bound in Flesh, Time, and Place,” 2016

My thesis work, Bound in Flesh, Time, and Place, became the culmination of this body of work.  It also served as an extremely cathartic process for me as I navigated through my experiences during the first 2 years after my mother’s death, and could feel a sense of closure after this work allowed me to convey all of the emotions I had felt but was unable to put into words.

Since graduation and the completion of my thesis, I have been working towards my next body of work with a series of studies of flesh and contrasting materials.  The human body and its grotesque qualities have become sort of the base focus of my work, however, I have been interested on the idea of heirloom objects and memory as things that remain as a source of comfort.  Having moved back to my childhood home in Ronkonkoma, after living in Portland for the past few years, it has been inspiring to be in such a familiar place with a new perspective and understanding.  I am looking forward to the development of this work and being able to share it with others.

"Vulnerability 1," 2017

“Vulnerability 1,” 2017

"Untitled Ring," 2016

“Untitled Ring,” 2016

To see more of my work you can visit my website: jgaiti.wixsite.com/jaimegaiti


“Human 1–5″ is currently on display in Main Street Arts’ fourth annual “Small Works” exhibition (juried by Cory E. Card, former curator at View Arts Center in Old Forge, NY). The exhibition runs through January 4, 2018 and can be previewed onlinestore.mainstreetartsgallery.com

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Anna Katalkina

I am originally from St. Petersburg, Russia, where I had my formative introduction to arts and culture. Growing up in that environment I was surrounded by two artistic worlds; the great Russo-European traditions of the city’s museums, architecture, and performing arts, but also the underground cultural explosion that came with the end of the Cold War – rockers, hippies, and a youthful fascination with the ‘new.’

Since I left Russia in the early 1990s, I have developed in several directions across  different places. I spent a few years near London in the UK, before moving to Birmingham, Alabama for six years. It was in Birmingham that my art-making began to shape up. Maybe because of the studio courses at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, or maybe because of the southern charm?

Part of my Arabian Nights series

The Fisherman and the Jinni, from my Arabian Nights series

Since 2002, I have lived and worked in the Washington, DC area.  I have painted, photographed, and completed a master’s degree at Georgetown, studying cultural diplomacy and Cambodian cultural regeneration. In terms of artistic inspiration, DC is the great place as it’s full of diverse people, world-renowned museums, and space to breathe. In addition to Washington, DC, I spend a lot of time in Paris and Brittany with my family, soaking up French arts, culture, and the joie-de-vivre along the way!

I have always been creative, but it has taken a long build to get to where I am now. At the age of 15, I bought a box of oil paints and started painting on any surface that I could find: cardboard, broken guitar backs, or vinyl. I haven’t had a moment of a single transformative art school, but I’ve learned from great talents throughout – at the UAB; at the Corcoran College of Art and Design; in the Maroger studio of artist Robert White; and by seeing countless exhibitions and museums I visit no matter where I go.

From my Candy and Mementoes series

From my Candy and Mementoes series

Over the years, I’ve worked in different mediums: narrative drawing, abstraction, photography and design, but am currently settled on a rooting in the Old Dutch Masters’ still lifes, with modern interpretation. These days I create vivid depictions of simple objects, which often convey much richer meaning than the elaborate. The style requires a large amount of layering, time, and patience, but ultimately it’s incomparable as a way of depicting still life. Making the still life (nature-morte) alive. My work expressly balances seriousness and humor, elegance and simplicity, tradition and modernity – it picks up the breezes from travel, theatre literature, and food.

Elephant on Red Jawbreaker

Elephant on Red Jawbreaker

Elephant work in progress

My inspiration is mainly in slowing down the fast pace of society and zooming in to objects with a certain meaning. I seek out and depict possible objects of desire, beauty and satisfaction – sometimes in the overtly beautiful, and often in the mundane. Candy and toys receive the same attention as fine porcelain figurines, capable of attracting the willing eye and triggering lighthearted memories and pleasure.

When preparing for a show, I tend to look for a common theme which can be explored through different objects. One of my series, Candy and Mementoes, explores the nostalgia and tactile charm that people have for childhood candy. The other, the Arabian Nights, interprets the tales from One Thousand and One Nights, merging  the cultural traditions of the East and the West.

Sinbad the Seaman

Sinbad the Seaman from my Arabian Nights series

You can find my work on my website at annakatalkina.com. I’m also on Instagram sharing photos of what catches the eye at Instagram.


See two of Anna’s paintings in Main Street Arts’ fourth annual “Small Works” exhibition (juried by Cory E. Card, former curator at View Arts Center in Old Forge, NY). The exhibition runs through January 4, 2018 and can be previewed onlinestore.mainstreetartsgallery.com. Anna’s piece, “Clay Duck and White Jellybeans” received a juror’s choice award for the exhibition!

Inside The Artist Studio with Christina Brinkman

Christina Brinkman

Christina Brinkman

I have worked as an artist is some form or another all my life.  I received my degree from Rochester Institute of Technology.  I began as a painter and printmaker, specializing in etchings and mixed media prints.  I also published a series of die-cut cards which rapidly expanded and were published under the name of Parrett Paper.  These cards were sold and distributed throughout the world in galleries, museums and high end stationery stores.  Some of these cards were chosen and published by the Museum of Modern Art.  MOMA also commissioned the design of an Umbrella and a Mobile.  Upon the sale of my company, I turned my sights back to the fine arts area and am now concentrating on porcelain vessels and sculpture.

'Among the Meadows', Handbuilt Porcelain, Glazed

‘Among the Meadows’, Handbuilt Porcelain, Glazed

Handbuilt Porcelain Vessel

Handbuilt Porcelain Vessel

'Fraternal Twins', Handbuilt Porcelain, Glazed, Gold Leaf

‘Fraternal Twins’, Handbuilt Porcelain, Glazed, Gold Leaf

Handbuilt Porcelain Vessel, Glazed

Handbuilt Porcelain Vessel, Glazed

Artist Satement I am guided by touch, engagement with the material.

Nature, memory and organic form bring direction and orientation.

It tries to be sympathetic with the natural world.

It is usually white, the absence of color, the sum of all colors.

White reflects simplicity, purity, nakedness, lightness, death, calm or stillness.

Without the distraction of color, one considers the outline, the interior and exterior space, the proportions and relationships of the form.

The shadows and the space around become an integral part of the work, the light reflecting surfaces and edges, the energy of what is and isn’t there.

I am never certain of its destination but it is often within the boundaries of the vessel form.

Sculpture tries to sneak in. And it wants to take over.

Handbuilt Porcelain, Blackened Steel, Unglazed

Handbuilt Porcelain, Blackened Steel, Unglazed

Handbuilt Porcelain Vessel, detail, Glazed

Handbuilt Porcelain Vessel, detail, Glazed

Seaform Series, Handbuilt Porcelain, Unglazed

Seaform Series, Handbuilt Porcelain, Unglazed

I have studios located in Rochester, NY and in Fort Lauderdale, FL and divide my time between the two.  My work is included in museum, public, private, and corporate collections, and am currently represented by Blue Spiral 1 Gallery in Asheville, NC.

My website is christinabrinkman.com


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Christina’s work in our fourth annual “Small Works” exhibition (juried by Cory E. Card, former curator at View Arts Center in Old Forge, NY). The exhibition runs through January 4, 2018 and can be previewed onlinestore.mainstreetartsgallery.com